scowl

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  • in reply to: KOIN adds Decades #19150
    scowl
    Participant

    Has anyone noticed if it has degraded the quality of the CBS diginet on KOIN?

    in reply to: FM Going Bye-Bye in Norway… #9710
    scowl
    Participant

    What will prevent pirates from transmitting DAB? It’s an open standard.

    Plus, there will be AM, FM, and shortwave radios there for at least another century.

    in reply to: FM Going Bye-Bye in Norway… #9707
    scowl
    Participant

    DAB is not HD Radio.

    in reply to: “UHF – The Future Begins in Portland, Oregon!” #2811
    scowl
    Participant

    Mechanical UHF tuners were actually all continuous, as far as I know. The tuning was accomplished either with variable capacitors or with a sliding shorting bar (to create a variable inductance). Later designs added mechanical detents and a fine-tuning knob to the UHF tuner easier to use and to give it a similar feel to that of the VHF tuner.

    Our fancier color television did have a real UHF selector knob. It may have really been a variable capacitor but it clicked between stations just like the VHF knob when you turned it.

    Looking at some schematics, I can see why they’d rather use variable capacitors for UHF. Even the VHF selector switches for twelve channels were large complicated multi-layered (don’t know the technical term for multiple switches on one knob) with several components for every channel. The amount of components to tune every UHF station with a switch would have been huge.

    in reply to: “UHF – The Future Begins in Portland, Oregon!” #2806
    scowl
    Participant

    The FCC had put a freeze on VHF grants. Portland wanted TV badly. We were in the stone age. The largest market in America without a TV station. Seattle had TV in 1948.

    So they weren’t willing to wait a year or two until the FCC sorted out the VHF interference problems? I guess with only one station, viewers didn’t have to worry about switching between UHF and VHF.

    One cheap “portable” B&W TV we had back in the early 70’s didn’t even have a UHF channel selector. You tuned the UHF band like a radio. I think it had some imprecise channel marks (20-30-40-50 and so on) but you just turned the knob until the channel came in. That met the FCC manufacturing requirement for UHF at the time.

    in reply to: “UHF – The Future Begins in Portland, Oregon!” #2789
    scowl
    Participant

    One question: why was KPTV a UHF station? My understanding is that UHF stations at the time only appeared in areas where the VHF band was too crowded. Portland wasn’t one of those areas.

    The DuMont network which was struggling for channel space in large cities proposed to the FCC that some cities become UHF-only cities which would allow far more stations with no potential for interference. That didn’t go over very well.

    in reply to: FCC Fines & Other FCC Happenings #2342
    scowl
    Participant

    Regarding the question of how CB shops get busted… there are law-abiding people who visit these shops and report illegal products they find. Many of the people are hams who are looking for converted transmitters that also operate on their bands. They do not want CB operators discovering these “new” bands that allow them to talk all around the world.

    in reply to: FCC Fines & Other FCC Happenings #2271
    scowl
    Participant

    In this case (WDGR in Dahlonega, Georgia) I could see how it might make sense. The town is very small, so small it looks like everyone in the city limits could receive it even though the transmitter’s a mile out of town. It’s distant from large cities so it could serve its entire community with this power.

    However I bet they’re trying to serve Gainesville which is about 15 miles away and six times the population of Dahlonega.

    In any case they’re off the air at the moment citing “water damage” to their transmitter. I guess they’re not a large budget operation. That $11,000 fine probably didn’t help.

    in reply to: FCC Fines & Other FCC Happenings #2269
    scowl
    Participant

    Many interesting cases here. One AM station was supposed to reduce its power to 1 (one) watt after sunset. Does it make sense for an AM station to operate at such reduced power? I can’t imagine enough people could receive the station to justify it being on the air.

    in reply to: FCC Fines & Other FCC Happenings #2268
    scowl
    Participant

    Oh, it looks like the FCC is no longer including NAL’s in the Field Notices section of their web site.

    Thanks! Something to read during lunch today!

    in reply to: FCC Fines & Other FCC Happenings #2266
    scowl
    Participant

    When I have nothing better to read during lunch, I go through the FCC site reading the recent violations. It makes me appreciate how hard it is to run a station with tower maintenance, program logs, EAS, keeping the signal on frequency and so on.

    I’ve noticed in recent years there have been no fines (NAL) enforced. There were lots of violations that resulted in $4,000-$16,000 fines in 2007-2009. Has the FCC gone soft or are there fewer serious violations these days?

    in reply to: FCC Fines & Other FCC Happenings #2221
    scowl
    Participant

    The licensee claimed that ads for MARIO’S AUTO SALES, BIG BRAND TIRE, and MUEBLERIA LA TAPATI were not commercials, but the FCC noted that the ads included comparative and qualitative language.

    Is this the difference between:

    “This program is sponsored by One Hand Insurance.”

    and

    “This program is sponsored by One Hand Insurance, the hand you can rely on if disaster strikes.”

    ?

    in reply to: Portland’s 1950’s Xmas Record – Label Has Shady Past #2104
    scowl
    Participant

    Are there any good lyrics? I bet a band will cover it!

    in reply to: Portland’s 1950’s Xmas Record – Label Has Shady Past #2099
    scowl
    Participant

    But what does the Christmas song sound like? With every other station playing non-stop awful Christmas music it should be easy to get it on the air.

    in reply to: Broadcasters Cope With Columbus Day Storm #299
    scowl
    Participant

    If you grew up in Oregon after the Columbus Day storm, that meant you had to listen to endless stories about the storm which got more and more outlandish as the years went by. I heard about hundreds of deaths, neighborhoods flattened, lakes drained of their contents leaving nothing but flopping fish, planes swatted out of the sky like toys, cattle found dead miles from their fields, etc. etc.

    My favorite: one man in Medford told me a mother lost her baby when it was blown out of her arms into the sky, never to be seen again. 😯

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)