nosignalallnoise

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 452 total)
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  • in reply to: Computer Clock Off by an Hour #47211
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    but the other one needed a new power supply, cost me $175.

    O U C H ! ! !

    I’m guessing at that price it was a proprietary power supply unit? If it were a standard xyzTX form factor PSU you could have gotten one for much cheaper off Amazon.

    But then, until maybe 15 years ago, Dell were playing this game of using standard-shape PSUs and motherboards but with nonstandard pinouts. So if you were to put say an off-the-shelf Corsair PSU on your Dell Intel mobbo you could end up dropping +12 volts onto a +3.3 volt rail and letting the magic smoke out. I don’t know if they are still doing those shenanigans. I kind of vaguely remember hearing or reading about a class-action lawsuit years ago that forced them to quit but I can’t be bothered to look it up. Gateway were doing the same crap around the turn of the century. It did make for a good supply of decent upright and desktop toolless ATX chassis, though.

    Dell definitely are still using proprietary form factor components today in their low-profile machines, alongside standard (compliant!) form-factor components in their full-size machines but they are more blatantly obvious about the proprietary stuff than they used to be.

    Could be worse, I guess. They could still be using LPX. “What’s that burning smell?”

    in reply to: Computer Clock Off by an Hour #47184
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Those are subjects I have limited expertise on in the Windoze domain. Let’s see what nosignal has to say.

    +1 for the dead-battery theory (which also affects Apple computers, by the way), and Andrew’s hypothesis of an update setting things haywire. But depending on the design and age of the motherboard and BIOS, once that battery goes, all kinds of weird shit can happen. (Then, of course, there’s the infamous and very obsolete Dallas RTC…..)

    This particular machine uses an ASROCK mobo (forget which model, but it’s from the early 2010s) and it tends to lose time so I have to manually resync it periodically either by listening to WWV or using the WWVB clock in the computer lab. If I have it unplugged for any significant length (i.e. more than an hour) it’ll completely whack out even with a strong battery.

    Doesn’t explain the mouse-related problems, sounds like the infrared LED or pickup must be dirty. A scrollwheel mechanism is just an optical shutter wheel like was once used in ball mice, and can collect all kinds of dust and crap which can make it sluggish or cause it to mistrack. It’s a very common failure mode. Pop the mouse open, grab a TFE can or fire up the air compressor and give ‘er a blowjob.

    in reply to: Delete #47160
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Typing to you now on Windows XP (NT 5.1). Lots I can’t do, but for basic surfing, audio streaming and posting on PDXRadio here in the garage as I work on my classic cars, it’s fine.

    No shit. I actually JUST put 5.1 on a machine less than a week ago, and on a new build, yet, with (mostly) modern hardware. (Pro SP3, dual-booting with Debian.) It’s slated to be a new audio processing machine and potentially a DVB receiver. It is functional but the machine itself is still incomplete. Even considering the 4-gigabyte addressable RAM limit on a 32-bit architecture it’s actually reasonably lightweight on today’s hardware, especially on multi-terabyte hard drives. The default Bozo-the-Clown “Luna” UI is still like hauling a fifthwheel with a Tesla, but converting to the lightweight “classic” 9x-esque GDI theme (and speeding it up considerably) is trivial.

    It’s still a viable platform and certainly more usable than NT 6+, though I don’t know if I’d be crazy about putting it on the network these days.

    in reply to: Delete #47152
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    I had predicted some years ago that NT 6.2/6.3 (a.k.a. 8 a.k.a. Windows Special Redmondites-Can’t-Count Edition) would be the beginning of the end of Winsux. Looks like they’re steaming forwards in their self-EOL quest with 10!

    Honestly, if you still have 6.1 (a.k.a. 7) then hang onto it for dear life.

    in reply to: Delete #47148
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    The documentation said “requires Windoze 8 or better”, so I converted to Linux.

    I know someone who did this. Then she wanted me to fix her computer.

    I’ve had to do it TO fix computers! Just before retiring it I fought with a Toshiba laptop with a flaky-ass BIOS that was constantly corrupting 98 installations in its last few months or so. Deltree windows, reload from image/turdball, rinse, repeat, etc…

    There was a time when I was servicing a network-facing Winblows was doing it once a week for a couple years. It was the frontend of a music automation system and would usually be full of crapware by the time Saturday came round. Image was of a fresh (heavily customised) XP/SP3 Pro install with all necessary software, FAT32 partitions with a custom MeSsy-DOS 7.0 installation (can you tell this was a while ago?) so I’d just go wipety-wipe and slap the image onto the drive, and be back up for another week in a couple hours. That fucking box had NO repeat NO actual security whatsoever (they just plugged it into the ethernet and let it sit on the Internet, carte blanche) and the operator insisted on keeping services on. Not my system or my place to tell them how to run it (as I was sternly reminded many a time), but hey, money’s money and I’ll take it any way I can get it from you.

    in reply to: Delete #47137
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    A:\>deltree c:\windows
    Delete directory “c:\windows” and all its subdirectories? [yn] y
    Deleting c:\windows…

    A:\>_

    in reply to: The Uncertain Future of Ham Radio #47112
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Anybody want to copy and paste the full text of the article here? I can’t read it because everything on spectrum.ieee.org just dumps me into an empty “Full Page Reload” thingything that contains no content other than a few IEEE site links, even when accepting cookies, javascripting turned on, even bypassing the firewall, and it just pukes and dies.

    I’m almost wondering if Commielink aren’t censoring it for whatever reason.

    in reply to: Covid 19 takes a back seat #47078
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    I’ve been on this earth long enough I no longer care to edit direct talk, and I’ve learned not confronting bullies is always the wrong choice. I’m not impressed. If some 2nd amendment nut can’t keep their gun in their pants then they can go to jail no matter what happens to me.

    Well, if an ornery, holier-than-thou prick is the kind of person you aspire to be then I guess you have bigger issues than you’re letting on. (Wouldn’t be the first one on this site probably won’t be the last.) From your posting history as of late you seem to have a lot of pent-up anger you’re keeping bottled up.

    Take care, and think about getting into some therapy.

    in reply to: The All-New PDX Radio Corporate Deathwatch #47044
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Oky doke.

    in reply to: The All-New PDX Radio Corporate Deathwatch #47038
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    I get the impression that companies are using the pan(dem)ic as a convenient reason to close up shop, do mass layoffs/sackings, cut employee hours (meaning: staff pay cuts) and play other financial games.

    There were companies that finally shut down because they had been in sketchy financial condition to begin with for years (Sweet Tomatoes, J.C. Penney’s, AMCommietopia) but there were a few around here that should have been able to stay open, at least judging by outside appearance. It just makes me think that businesses are using it as an easy excuse to justify cashing out.

    I know it’s not a PC enough opinion for you guys; deal with it.

    Any establishment based on children being in close contact is going to have great difficulty in the next year or more. Too bad, they just opened up a huge new store here in Kennewick.

    I find it amazing that businesses based on children being in close contact with anybody are even still a thing, what with paranoia being what it is these days, disease pan(dem)ic notwithstanding. Parents are unhealthily overprotective of their precious little snowflakes. You know, you look in the direction of a kid, or you politely say “hello” as you’re casually passing a mom and baby on the street, you’re suddenly a stalker/child rapist/pervert/trendy-adjective-of-the-week-this-week. If “Discovery Zone” had opened in 2015 instead of the early 90s, they probably would have become a footnote after only a couple years.

    I mean, last week I was driving through an area with a buddy and we were on one of the FRS low-band frequencies the entire time, we got into range of some kids playing with HTs on the same frequency and were suddenly being balled out by their father (?) calling us “stalkers” and to “get off of their line”, etc. Yeah, okay; whatever, dude. We stayed on frequency (would have done regardless), and we were through there and out of range in about 3 minutes anyways.

    in reply to: Covid 19 takes a back seat #47037
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    asking people (male) who won’t wear a mask why they are such a pussy they can’t handle it. Of course that’s not PC either but at this point I’m really not interested in people’s feelings.

    Wow, you must be lots of fun to be around at parties. Better make sure your insurance is paid up and you’re ready to deal with the (potentially lethal) backlash if you actually choose to go that route.

    Boomers… :rolleyes:

    in reply to: The All-New PDX Radio Corporate Deathwatch #46847
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    “24 Hour Fungus”!

    in reply to: JC Penney to close several OR stores #46726
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Then some years ago a freestanding JCPenney opened in Vancouver’s lower east side.

    I want to say it opened sometime around 2005 or 2006ish. It was one of the first major stores along with Home De-Pot and WallyWorld to open in English Pit. The Sonic Burger across the access road opened VERY shortly thereafter!

    It’s actually not a terribly old store.

    in reply to: 80s MTV VHS Recordings #46723
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    And fuzz it out with deinterlacing and noise reduction…oh yeah, let’s also boost treble response so that awesome linear bias-harmonics squeal gives the listener a throbbing migrane!

    So retro!

    in reply to: 80s MTV VHS Recordings #46720
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    The audio quality was excellent but proportional to the diameter of your backyard dish (in relation of course to your latitude) and the quality of the receiver. If you watched on cable, remember, back then cable operators had to (and in many cases still) receive the signal on a dish, demodulate the video and audio and then remodulate it onto their system where they often have to limit bandwidth (and subsequently frequency response) so they can fit all those channels. Of course, that entire analysis is dated before digital, but we are talking about old tapes made from one of those cable feeds or backyard dish setups.

    The audio system used by the VCR used to do the recording (or transfer!) also is a factor. The bulk of VCRs in place until the late 1990s had linear audio which, honestly, sucks monkey balls. HIFI didn’t emerge in VHS-land until 1986 and didn’t become ubiquitous until well over a decade later when prices came down far enough that most new machines (except for the cheapest of the cheap) had it as a standard feature. Even more people (including those who had HIFI machines) recorded through the RF input, and the modulators in cable/sat receivers were usually mono. And of course, in linear mode (just like with cassettes and reels) S/N and frequency response both take a steep dump at lower speeds, especially in the EP/SLP mode that so many people fetishised over and jacked off to for far too long. Quantity trumps quality.

    And of course, there are the genuises today who who wouldn’t know linear audio from circular. But they see a cheap early 2010s all-plastic Chinese Worst Buy/Wally World mono piece of shit VCR for $10 at the Salvation Army and suddenly develop the urge to transfer their “old VCRs to ‘digital'”. (Yes, I really have heard people call their VHS tapes “VCRs”.)

    The ultimate result? More crappy audio from tapes that may very well have been recorded on HIFI decks way back when and probably sound reasonably OK otherwise! Granted a low-speed linear recording is going to continue to sound like garbage no matter how high of quality the deck it’s played back on is. But an halfway decent recording needs to be played on an halfway decent deck to really get anything worthwile out of it.

    Consider, also, that MTV (along with HBO and possibly a few others) sent stereo audio as an FM “station”, in the broadcasting band. The idea was you’d connect your stereo system to the cable and set its tuner to whichever frequency your headend was sending it out on, and listen through it. This is what there was before BTSC was approved for cable usage in the early 90s. Cable FM was usually attenuated severely to avoid interfering with terrestrial FM stations in case of a signal leak, and any repeater mains hum and thermal noise would be picked up and regenerated by repeaters further along the lossy copper trunks that cable systems were comprised of then (still are in some places). It gives one pause to marvel at the idea that it even worked at all, let alone as well as it did for as long as it did.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 452 total)