Mickproper

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  • in reply to: Apple vs The FBI #19122

    Mickproper
    Participant

    There’s an important point in all of this, that everybody seems to have missed.
    FACT: The FBI wasn’t asking Apple for something that already existed; it – and the Federal court – were trying to force Apple to create something new, something that doesn’t presently exist, and that would require at least several hundred man-hours to produce.
    FACT: Under the “Citizens United” decision by SCOTUS, a corporation – Apple included – is a “citizen”, whose equal rights are protected by the 14th Amendment, including presumably, the 13th Amendment right against involuntary servitude.
    FACT: If a corporate citizen, one who has committed no crime, can be forced into involuntary servitude – slavery, that is – can you and I be far behind?

    in reply to: Portland Area’s “Radio Voice Honor Roll” Memoriam #2389

    Mickproper
    Participant

    Thanks, Craig; I’d forgotten how many of these folks I miss. The only (slight) correction I would offer, is that “Dr. Jazz” Fetsch actually had a first name: “Bill”.

    in reply to: On air names #854

    Mickproper
    Participant

    I actually worked with a guy – at my very first radio job – who, in 15 years of being the station’s mid-day man, had NEVER used a name on the air. Not his real name, not an air name, nothing. We finally got him at Christmas, by starting a “Holiday Greetings” reel for all the station staff to record their holiday greetings for the audience. Everybody made a point of using their right at the top of the recording, i.e.: “Hi everybody! This is Mickey Jay wishing you the best Holiday Season ever and a Great New Year!” He couldn’t refuse, without looking like a jerk. The first time we played his cut: “Hi this is Don DeVos (his real name); from my house to yours, have a wonderful Christmas and a Happy New Year”, we got about 6 or 7 calls from listeners: “You know, I’ve been listening for (X) years, and that’s the first time I ever heard that guy use his name!”

    He never did forgive us.

    in reply to: On air names #852

    Mickproper
    Participant

    Here’s my favorite “air name” story:

    Back in about 1960, there was a DJ in Minneapolis, very popular, who went by “Ole Olson”. When he was casting about for a new job, the folks at KSJB, in Jamestown, North Dakota, offered him a whole potful of money, to come and be their prime mid-day man. They’d just gotten a power increase from 1K to 5K, and they wanted to take full advantage of the increased coverage area.

    Although he was reluctant to head out to the sticks, the money was just too good to pass up, so he agreed. The station management was elated, and for about six weeks before his debut, plastered the airwaves, and all the other available media, with “Ole Olson Is Coming!” spots and promos.

    Then disaster struck! The Friday afternoon before his new announcer was supposed to start, the station manager gets a call from Ole. He’s sorry, but he’s had a last-minute matching offer from a station in Duluth, and after all, North Dakota IS the middle of nowhere, he hopes you’ll understand, blah, blah blah.

    The station management is beside itself; by coincidence however, the station also had another new announcer starting that same week: a new overnight guy, in his first actual radio job, fresh out of Brown Radio Institute in Minneapolis. In the blink of an eye, he was re-christened “Ole Olson”, told to deepen his voice so he sounded a little older, and put on the air!

    He’s still there. He’s a leading citizen of the community, and the broadcaster emeritus of the station, having just celebrated his 50th anniversary with them!

    in reply to: On air names #814

    Mickproper
    Participant

    When I first started in radio, you used air names for two reasons: First, because back then, there was almost no such thing as an “unlisted” number, and if you used your real name, you’d almost certainly get crank calls at home.

    Secondly, it was just kind of the style for DJs to have a “friendly” first name, and a one-syllable second name, so you had “Mickey Jay”, “Bobby Gaye” (he’s still working under that name, believe it or not), and the like. A lot of times, you’d also have somebody try for an alliterative effect (“Wee Windy Winslow”, “Slammin’ Sammy Salmon” etc.)

    In my own case, I just never liked being recognized in public. I always hated it when somebody would say “You sound familiar; have you been on the radio?”

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