Why does 1059 The Brew speed up it's music???

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  • #11525
    radiodork
    Spectator

    The Brew needs to stop speeding up its music,it sounds ridiculous. The songs are played so fast they dont even sound right. Why are they doing this?????? They were playing U2’s with or without you the other day and the song sounded like a FAST SONG, ive never heard that song played at such a fast speed. If you go back and forth between KGON and the Brew, you can really tell how ridiculous the Brew sounds. Some songs sound worse than others. “with or without you”by U2 sounds so fast its almost laughable also “You could be mine”by Guns N Roses is sped up, I have never heard that song played by any radio station at such a fast speed. Im not trying to hate on the brew because I enjoy the station BUT they need to get it together with the music. Adjust the speed of the songs because it sounds LIKE CRAP!!!!! Also more variety would be nice, you guys play the same 10 songs over and over.
    One last issue I have with the brew is the edited versions they are playing of certain songs. They continue to play a half-assed edited version of “livin on the edge” By Aerosmith. They have a really bizarre version of “Jeremy” by Pearl jam that is edited. “Lightning Crashes” by Live is edited, the entire first verse of the song is removed. I don’t understand why they are not playing the album versions of ALL songs? They call themselves Portland’s Rock station yet I continue to hear edited versions of certain songs. Rock stations don’t edit their muscic, they play the full-length album versions of all songs. Apparently the Brew does not realize this.

    #11529
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    More time per hour for commercials. Think about it. Save one second per minute and that’s 60 sec. per hour.

    It’s all about ratings and money.

    The better question is why does anyone listen to it?

    #11531
    radiodork
    Spectator

    i agree Andy, but one thing i like about KGON is they do NOT speed their music up and they always play full length album versions, they don’t play these half assed radio edits that the Brew is playing. Which is probably why KGON continues to beat them in the ratings and the Brew’s listening audience continues to erode.

    #11541
    paulwalker
    Participant

    There are two main reasons why this happens. #1, as mentioned above, gives a little more time for ads. But that isn’t the biggest reason.

    #2. Some songs, if not a majority, sound better speeded up. Don’t get me wrong. I said, “some songs”. If you can create a better tempo, then you win.

    Disclaimer: Stations need to do this with moderation. Too high a speed will indeed make the songs sound crazy. Use it with moderation and you will be “golden”.

    #11543
    radiodork
    Spectator

    Some songs, if not a majority, sound better speeded up. Don’t get me wrong. I said, “some songs”. If you can create a better tempo, then you win.

    WOW I completely disagree Paulwaker.Is that a personal opinion or a fact? Classic Rock/ Rock stations should NEVER mess with the tempo of the songs because people have heard these songs thousands of times and dont want their music messed with.
    How do they sound better speeded up? They sound less like the album. Again The Brew and KGon share SOME songs and its so funny when you hear them on the Brew than on KGON because they sound AWFUL on the Brew. Songs that were meant to be SLOW and have always been slow are now speeded up on the Brew and sound like a remixed faster version of the song.
    Hey Paul Tell The program Director/music director at KGON to start speeding up the classic rock and they will probably laugh in your face.
    Also- why do some of the songs sound faster than others. Dont radio stations just flip a switch and make everything come out of the speakers faster or is it per song. That U2 song is so laughable because it is played at such a high speed on THe Brew. That is so terrible.

    #11548
    semoochie
    Participant

    I thought it was interesting that the first poster said that The Brew only played ten songs and named five of them. I was waiting for the rest. 🙂

    #11549
    paulwalker
    Participant

    To answer your question, they speed up everything, and my original post was incorrect. It is not a song to song decision. But really, I’m not the target here. I’m just explaining what happens. And I was referring to oldies mainly from the 60’s and early 70’s. Pop hits, many of which are ballads, and many of which really need a speed pitch. But please recognize I only suggested a moderate speed up. I can understand keeping the music as it was recorded, but I also understand radio stations needing to make their product sound great.

    #11554
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    The Brew is applying a very classic Top-40 approach to their format. The thinking is that when the same songs are heard on KGON or on a listener’s personal music collection, they will sound less exciting and as if they were “dragging.” Using shortened radio edits of the songs allows them to play more songs per hour, and it increases the chances that a listener will sit through a song that he or she is not terribly excited about, rather than changing the station or turning the radio off altogether.

    I am not saying that it is right or wrong to use these formatic approaches, but I think that it is important to recognize that what The Brew is doing dates back to youth-oriented radio programming from the 1960s.

    People who don’t like a Top-40ish approach to classic rock might tell you that the audience that this music had when it was new were people who had outgrown the trappings of 1960s Top-40 radio. They wanted radio stations to treat their music more like classical music (FM stereo, no jingles, no singing commercials, serious announcers, no talking over the song intros, etc.)

    People who defend The Brew’s approach might tell you that the audience of educated young adults from relatively affluent backgrounds who listened to classic rock songs when they were new no longer exists. Those people moved on to other styles of music, while the contemporary audience for classic rock is primarily blue collar. They would say that classic rock stations are now being played at construction sites and in industrial settings; the music is not being finely scrutinized at home on headphones or on hi-fi equipment.

    #11561
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Whatever the hell they’re doing, it’s all about profits over public service.

    As far as the claim that ANYTHING sounds “BETTER” when pitched up (or that old songs “need” to be sped up), that’s #1)subjective, since “better” is in the ears of the listener and #2)parody, since altering an official release FOR ANY REASON is departing from what was intended. You might even call it distorting an original with the purpose of drawing attention to something that otherwise would not be listened to due to the industry having overplayed it when it was new.

    Only desperate programmers need to resort to distorting classic songs in an attempt to attract attention. Remember, ratings are not about whether people like or respect what they tune in, they are about just the fact they did tune in and how long they tolerated the crap that the industry foists upon the few remaining listeners out there.

    Sad, sad, sad. The Brew, untrue to the music. Anything for a buck.

    Sorry Paul, you can try but you can’t defend the lack of ethics in radio programming no matter how hard you try.

    #11562
    RobP
    Participant

    >>Whatever the hell they’re doing, it’s all about profits over public service.<<

    It’s always been that way, even with mom and pop operations. You think they were in business just to serve the community? Uh, no.

    It has become worse now that other people’s money is used to run radio companies (aka shareholders) but the concept isn’t a new one.

    #11569
    semoochie
    Participant

    I feel I should point out that The Brew and KGON are on different formats with different audiences! KGON is a typical Classic Rock station, serving the high end of 25-54 and beyond. The Brew has evolved into a Rock station sans currents with an 80s/90s base. My 40 year-old son-in-law is really into The Brew but I don’t think he’d go near KGON with a ten foot pole!

    #11571
    jr_tech
    Participant

    Since it is easy to speed up a tune *without* changing the pitch, do some stations still “speed up-pitch up” like in the old days of speeding up a a record, or does the favored process now just involve speed up?

    #11577
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    “It’s always been that way, even with mom and pop operations. You think they were in business just to serve the community? Uh, no.”

    As usual, you missed the point and are wrong about time compression of music. Yes, there have always been certain technologies that have existed for years to do this, but corporate owners have not used time compression to abuse the music in decades past. In a commercial, perhaps. Yes, it’s old, and all those pauses were razor bladed out of spots to get more info in 30 seconds, and then in the 80’s when harmonizers could do time compression it was used for promos and spots, but what they are doing now is IMO tantamount to defacing the art. It was bad enough when Top 40 radio commanded it’s own edited singles and music companies that had the control over the artists did that. It’s just become a big corporate circus and no, it has never been like that before, certainly not to this extent. You are wrong, Rob.

    #11578
    paulwalker
    Participant

    Andy, I am not trying to defend tactics of radio stations as much as just explaining why they do what they do. Yes, some of my posts tend make this sound like an ideal thing to do. For that, I am sorry.

    However, I totally understand the mindset of stations that use this technique. As others have pointed out, it isn’t new. NexGen (the later version of Prophet), allows stations to pitch up the music. Yes, it can be abused, but used moderately, can be a nice flavor enhancer to the product. If that somehow can enhance ratings, then I place no blame. Of course, this has never been proven, and probably will never be.

    But to assume that I have bad ethics in our biz is unfair. In my career, I have done what it takes to win, and increasing pitch by less than 1% does not equal bad ethics, IMO.

    I could offer bad ethics in a three page memo in the radio biz, but I won’t. Song pitch is not anywhere near the top.

    #11581
    stevethedj
    Participant

    I was told by a CE, Ted Hicks of KUGN, Eugene in the 70’s. That they speeded up the records one noch to improve ratings. We used to speed up cassetts on sermons at KPDQ to fit in spots when oversold.

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