Towers & Such & Things 2018 (and 2019)

feedback.pdxradio.com forums feedback.pdxradio.com forums Portland Radio Towers & Such & Things 2018 (and 2019)

This topic contains 177 replies, has 26 voices, and was last updated by  nosignalallnoise 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 178 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #38844

    russell-curry
    Participant

    Back in 1974, we stayed overnight at a motel in Winchester Bay. I was able to pick up KINK really well there, I’d say about how KNRK comes in in Salem. It faded out immediately as we drove away, and I wondered if maybe they had some kind of booster operating. I’ve since come to know how variable FM can be on the coast, even from room to room.

    #38847

    semoochie
    Participant

    In 1974, I think KINK had about 300 bays, so that might have had an effect! 🙂

    #38850

    Broadway
    Participant

    333 watts each bay…check…

    #39249

    russell-curry
    Participant

    Another ’70s FM DX experience I remember was a bus trip to California with a Realistic portable, back when the dial was much less crowded. I picked up 105.1 from Salem, from the summit south of Ashland. By the time we got to Weed, at least one Sacramento was in with a better than DX quality signal, while 93.7 from Medford and 98.5 from Klamath were still in well. When I got my first FM Atlas, I was pretty surprised to find Sacramento stations were well short of full-strength.

    #39251

    W7PAT
    Participant

    Back in those days, you could pick up KINK all the way up to Bellingham.

    #39685

    russell-curry
    Participant

    has anyone tried the Terk dual-drive FM indoor antenna? I read a review by a guy in Tumwater, saying he’s getting a perfect signal from a Longview station. I’m guessing it’s 107.1, whose broadcast site isn’t as far from Tumwater as he might thin–still, not too shabby.

    #39688

    semoochie
    Participant

    It’s the water. 🙂

    #39692

    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    I know from experience that you can get KKCW (K Killer Commercial Wasteland) more or less reliably all the way out to the WA coast, at least as far away as Westport/Ghettodeen.

    Why you would even want to is another question.

    #39697

    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Amplified receiving antennae are great noise boosters, too. They are the lazy way to pick up distant stations. A better solution is always a directional rx antenna and a rotor. Amplified rx antennae are basically putting a broadband amplifier in line before the (sometimes very well designed) front end which when overdriven folds faster than a bad poker hand.

    #39698

    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    That is true, but if you don’t have anywhere to put an antenna like that (like apartments) then an amplifier is what you may be stuck using. Amplifiers that are actually worth spending money on will have a gain adjustment control to avoid overload.

    #39708

    russell-curry
    Participant

    An indoor setup I got some great results with, at least in places where there weren’t really strong signals, was a C-craneground-plane antenna hooked to my best portable, through a basic Radio-Shack FM booster.
    For instance:
    KWVA, 88.1, back when they were doing 550w from the UO campus, from a pretty good location in southwest Salem, not reliable but not unusual.
    KBCS, 91.3, Bellevue, from a just okay location a few miles south of Chehalis, about 20 years ago before their signal upgrade, barely ID-able, I think fairly normal reception.

    #39711

    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    In set-top indoor antenna designs, both FM and TV, I wonder whether amplifiers just end up being a marketing gimmick under most circumstances, as Andy suggested. Amplifiers make sense when driving long runs of cable. However, when the cable is only 6′ or so, the loss is negligible. Only if your radio is very insensitive and there are no strong signals would a broadband signal booster help you.

    There are some tuned amplifiers that can help out in reducing intermodulation issues. These can be used either with indoor or outdoor antennas. The reason that these devices work is that they can reduce the strength of the signals causing the interference.

    Really good radio designs optimize the first radio frequency amplifier for the lowest noise. It turns out that this type of optimization only works over fairly narrow frequency ranges. Hypothetically speaking, if the first RF amplifier in an FM radio is designed to pass signals to about +/- 1 MHz of the frequency that it is tuned to, that amplifier can be a very good performer from a noise standpoint. An amplifier designed to boost the entire FM band is going to be noisier because it cannot be optimized as much. The near DC to almost 1 GHz amplifier ICs that go into amplified rabbit ear TV antennas are even worse because they represent some pretty serious design compromises.

    #39740

    Bob Berry
    Participant

    “The Swiss government has given the country’s public broadcaster approval to turn off its digital terrestrial TV (known as over-the-air to most people) by the end of 2019. It will be the first nation in Europe to do so.”
    (Source: Fortune)

    #39763

    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Here is the story: http://fortune.com/2018/09/06/switzerland-terrestrial-tv-shutdown/

    I suspect that in Switzerland and some of the other European countries that may shut off terrestrial TV, the state public broadcaster was the only entity that was awarded broadcast licenses. This makes it much easier to pull the plug on an entire class of broadcast service (much like LW and MW in some countries).

    #39888

    LinleyG
    Participant

    Since at least Oct. 10th KMNT (Portland, RF 45, Ch. 24-1 to 24-5) has periodically operated at low power during the day. I measure about a 27 dB reduction. But, up to now it has returned to full power later in the day. Today it was at low power all day including this evening. (I check at ~9AM, ~3PM and ~9PM as part of my “how do DTV signal amplitudes vary” project). Being only 14 mi out, my TV sets hardly note the difference but I bet no one outside of the metro area can receive their signal.

    For the moment I assume it’s part of their project to move the RF 45 antenna to allow the erecting the new RF 32 antenna. The new antenna will need after post repack. KNMT filed for a STA describing this.

    KEVE-LD (RF 36, ch. 36) has been experiencing random carrier trips for several weeks now. It must make watching that channel hard. I have to watch to make sure a trip doesn’t occur while I am averaging its amplitude for my measurement

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 178 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.