The Millenial generation gap

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  • #4535
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Perhaps it is a sign of aging that I am starting to notice distinct cultural differences between Millennial generation people (the under 30s) and people of my age group (Generation X, born in the 1970s).

    A few days ago, I heard one such example explained on The Clark Howard Show. Clark said that until fairly recently, two career limiters were coming across as a “job hopper” and having gaps in one’s employment history. The two put together were a career-killing double-whammy. The entrance of the Millennials into the workforce has been causing these paradigms to change. Employees now do not feel that they should be any more loyal to companies than the companies are to them. (I think that there was a subtle implication that today, leaving a job for a better one might be seen as a trait of somebody who is assertive about developing his or her career path.) It is also no longer taboo to quit a job without having something else lined up. Clark concluded with a caution to hiring managers that if they stick by the old paradigms, they could be inadvertently passing up some of the top Millennial generation talent.

    Another example, which I did not realize until very recently, is the writing style of British newspapers. When I started seeing links to stories from British newspapers a few years ago, I thought that I was reading their equivalent to The National Enquirer. I then learned that many of these publications were “serious” newspapers for many years, but they started to adjust their coverage and reporting style in the late 1990s in an attempt to stay relevant to younger readers.

    Then, of course, there is the Beloit Mindset List (mentioned in another thread):
    http://www.beloit.edu/mindset/2018/
    Today’s college freshmen likely never used Netscape Navigator, let alone NCSA Mosaic!

    #4579
    QPatrickEdwards
    Participant

    My wife and I have friends that we visit every so often (both women, one is 19, a WOU student and planning to enter the mission field in Central America the other is 20, a Free Methodist Oregon ministerial candidate and graduating from U of O next year) and it is interesting to get their ideas about technology, society, politics and the like.

    Since my wife graduated from PSU in the pre-Internet era, she had to ask them this question: “Is doing a research paper easier now, with the Internet? How often do you have to actually go to the library?” From their answer it seems that they spend the same amount of time on their papers, but they are able to be more productive with their time actually being able to do research instead of spending “sneaker time” going back and forth to the library.(I am sure that it is much easier to be able to use a word processor app to write a paper than the old electric typewriter from my wife’s college days that we still have in our storage shed!)

    Another place where they differ is in politics. They would both be considered “social conservatives,” but not the type of knee-jerk reactionaries that we are used to. Their views are multifaceted–based on individual issues and seem to be a bit more reasoned. I don’t know if this is common with most millenials, but it is an interesting observation.

    To further exacerbate the perceived “gap”, my wife and I are technically Generation-X, but we identify much more with the Baby Boomer generation as far as our friends, values, adaptation to technology and choices of entertainment are concerned. This could be due to the fact that our parents weren’t boomers.(In fact, my wife was raised by her grandparents through her high school years and most of my cousins were boomers.)

    #4582
    Vitalogy
    Participant

    Baby Boomer ideas are dying daily. Burying cash in the back yard isn’t a good idea, even if you don’t trust the banks.

    As for Millenials, well, I have to laugh. They are racking up student loan debt beyond what they understand when it comes to the concept of paying back borrowed money.

    A majority of them figure this out once the repayments become reality.

    #4615
    Chris_Taylor
    Participant

    As a baby boomer, my personal observations thinks about half of the boomers I know embraced the technological changes and the other half didn’t or have really struggled with them. We were the guinea pig generation for Apple and Microsoft.

    The learning curve for some of us has been very difficult. Some of us, by default, learned what we needed to learn in order to survive and thrive. But even then, it has come a some great costs along the way.

    My young Milennial kids will certainly need to learn some fiscal understanding of debt. Our daughter, in particular, who is racking up a nice college debt, will be entering into a field of work, that at this moment, is in need of what she can offer. Rubber meets the road when she graduates this May.

    Our techie son is taking a more logical approach. Working full-time, using his computer knowledge and skills to learn what needs to be learned in order to get to where he wants to be without the need of college. He can get certified while on the job or online. Saving his money we had for his post high school education. He hates debt.

    However, I am also hopeful when it comes to Milennials, since they grew up with technology, they may find more useful ways to help us solve some of our biggest issues. The hang ups of some of my more conservative boomers concerning abortion, same-sex marriage and other hot button issues, are just not that important to Milennials. They have plenty of gay and lesbian friends and many of the Milennials are choosing not to start families so young.

    I’m also hearing from Milennials that we need to loosen up a bit.

    Reality is always hard when you’re younger and just starting out. But this is where you set the tone for your life as you move forward. I have great faith in the Milennials, I think they will figure things out, eventually, and surprise us boomers along the way. I’m looking forward to that.

    #4616
    Amus
    Participant

    Baby Boomer ideas are dying daily. Burying cash in the back yard isn’t a good idea, even if you don’t trust the banks.

    A bit of a time warp there.
    I think your perspective is skewed.

    That was the generation of the depression, at least a generation before boomers.

    #4619
    Vitalogy
    Participant

    In 2014 people are still keeping money in a safe, under the mattress, or in the back yard. They are typically older (Baby Boomers), or are immigrants from places where you don’t trust the “FDIC”. It’s a sad and scary fact.

    #4622
    Chris_Taylor
    Participant

    And those folks probably won’t change that way of dealing with their money. So I wouldn’t waste my time with them.

    With credit unions well established as an alternative to banks, some who are willing to try something different might consider CUs over traditional banking. My CU has nearly 70,000 members and has always beating banks on interest rates, credit cards and loans. But one must do their homework when choosing CUs.

    Our 18 year old son wants me to go with him to our financial advisor through our CU, and talk to them about what he could be doing now with some of the money we saved for his college education. He is a big picture thinker and since he doesn’t have a loan debt over him, he’s already thinking years down the road. Then again, that is so my son.

    #4665
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Because of the Great Depression, I think that most of us have heard stories about old people who don’t trust banks. These are the people who stash large amounts of cash or who buy large quantities of jewelry or precious metals. It scares me to think, what if they are burglarized?

    However, I think that Americans generally do not think, what would it be like to come from a society with a very high rate of inflation, where people do not trust the money? In recent time, such places have included various Latin American countries, Russia, and Italy (before the Euro). I grew up with some interesting dynamics that came about because of high inflation (although I did not connect the dots until many years later). In short, people who are around high inflation for a long time tend to not want to save money. If they have enough money to buy a TV, for instance, they will buy it because they feel anxiety that a few months later, that same TV will be out of reach.

    #4678
    kennewickman
    Participant

    I got a kick out of my ‘ handler ‘ at Bank of America when I refinanced my home loan last summer. I had put down on the application that I had been with my current employer for 23 years. She was a 30 something I think..maybe even late 20s …but she went on and on about how she couldn’t imagine working for one employer for 23 years !!!

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