The Factor's racist segment

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  • #23625
    Vitalogy
    Participant

    Watch for yourself.

    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/watters-world-mocks-asian-americans

    Meanwhile, anyone under the age of 70 is like WTF? They put this on TV in 2016?

    #23629
    #23631
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    In contemporary society, mocking ethnic or cultural groups crosses a taboo line. The only groups that do not seem to enjoy this protection are White, working class people (mainly from Appalachia and the South) and members of youth subcultures.

    I don’t like to see the term “racism” invoked willy-nilly, but in this segment Chinese and Japanese cultural elements are deliberately confused for the sake of laughs. I think that there is an implication that anybody who doesn’t look “Western” must be Chinese. This is what gives the segment a racist feel.

    #23632
    duxrule
    Participant

    “Stereotyping isn’t racism.”

    Yeah, it is. Trying to re-define it is gross rationalization.

    Your link even admits as much:

    “People engage in stereotyping based on people’s race, gender, religion, social class and even nationality. These stereotypes can not only lead to faulty beliefs, but also result in prejudice and discrimination. Racism in this sense can be considered as a result of stereotypic beliefs.”

    Epic fail, Bacon.

    #23633

    Did I say stereotyping is good? Did I say I thought that segment was appropriate?

    The fail is in the misleading topic title. Stereotyping isn’t racism. Stereotyping can be positive too. Racism never can be.

    #23634
    duxrule
    Participant

    Didn’t read the direct quote from your author, did you?

    “People engage in stereotyping based on people’s race, gender, religion, social class and even nationality. These stereotypes can not only lead to faulty beliefs, but also result in prejudice and discrimination. Racism in this sense can be considered as a result of stereotypic beliefs.”

    Why don’t you go ahead and provide us with a “positive” stereotype?

    #23635

    Black people excel at sports.

    Asians are good at math.

    These would be examples of “positive” stereotyping. I’m not saying it’s a good thing, but it’s not in the same league as racism.

    Racism is a belief that a particular race is inherently superior or inferior.

    I’ve seen some funny stuff on the internet that stereotypes white people. Some of it rings true to me and some doesn’t. Some of it is a little unfair or offensive. But it’s not racism.

    #23636
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    What complicates the racism issue is that to some, the way that people were systematically discriminated against in the past, based on appearance, is part of the definition. At one time, there were communities that did not allow dark-skinned people to be within city limits after sunset. At one time, people who looked “Chinese” were seen as laborers, and they were not allowed to intermarry with Whites. In the US, people with fair complexions did not face these types of discrimination based on appearance. This is the line of reasoning that “minorities can’t be racist” people use. I find that line of reasoning to be a form of political wrangling to own the term, and I don’t completely agree with it.

    There have also been times in US history when discrimination has been turned against Irish immigrants, Italian immigrants, and Catholics. The first two of these groups are very difficult to identify based on appearance, so few people try to make claims of racism. The last group is virtually impossible to identify based on appearance.

    #23637
    Vitalogy
    Participant

    “Black people excel at sports.
    Asians are good at math.
    These would be examples of “positive” stereotyping. I’m not saying it’s a good thing, but it’s not in the same league as racism.”

    Those aren’t positive stereotypes.

    A far majority of Black people don’t excel at sports. A far majority of Asians don’t excel in math.

    Stereotypes are racist by definition.

    #23638
    Vitalogy
    Participant

    But if you’re a 50+ catholic fundamentalist, you must love the relationship with the “father” and the alter boy.

    #23639

    LOL

    Are you making a joke or are you totally blind to the irony?

    Anyway, I’m sorry to inform you that stereotyping is not racism by definition.

    #23647
    duxrule
    Participant

    That’s oversimplifying. Stereotyping is a component of racism, and that cannot be denied.

    #23651
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    When I was in high school, PBS’s Antiques Roadshow ran an episode on racist memorabilia. The items were from just after the Civil War until about the 1920s. In my recollection, the items all depicted African-Americans as jolly and child-like. There were signs, dolls, figurines, etc. One item that sticks in my mind was an animated figurine that had a man playing a piano and a woman dancing.

    When the items shown in that episode were new, they probably were not offensive. I would hazard a guess that people of that era believed the stereotype that all African-Americans were carefree people who loved to dance. By the early 1990s, when the show aired, most of our society would have considered these portrayals “racist” (hence the name of the episode). Times change.

    #23652
    LurkingGrendel
    Participant

    “…cannot be denied”.

    It can be denied by willful assholes.

    #23653
    edselehr
    Participant

    A positive stereotype is negative if that stereotype is the entirety of your perception of that group.

    The negativity comes from what is omitted from the stereotype. If you think the only relevant trait of blacks is that they are athletic, or the only relevant trait of Asians is that they are adept at math, you are denying them the fullness of being complete people, and being completely human.

    I was an “A” student in high school, and regularly called a “brain”. And I always bristled at it, thought it was usually said with admiration. Because I knew I was so much more than my GPA, and was frustrated that no one was able or willing to see the complete me.

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