Seattle Radio Happenings

Tagged: , ,

Viewing 15 posts - 211 through 225 (of 452 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1525
    semoochie
    Participant

    This is only the second construction permit and the previous one was for South Mountain. They must have a reason for switching to Capital Peak. Perhaps, the lease was too much or line-of-site to Seattle proper is better, even with reduced facilities. I’m intrigued that they had to address Canadian interference complaints this time, where they didn’t have to before, at full power.

    #1526
    Chico
    Participant

    Well, Vancouver has a full class C co-channel, so I might imagine they’d have something to say about it. Cap Peak- straight shot north to the eastern suburbs of Vancouver with nothing but low hills and salt water in the way. South Mountain- line of sight stops just 25 miles north of Seattle…the Olympic Mountains block everything north of there.

    But it is intriguing, and you may be correct, Semoochie. From my understanding, South Mountain is a better Seattle signal AND less hassle to the Canucks. Maybe it is simply a $$ issue. But if they want it to be a Seattle station seems like South Mountain would be better for them. But I am not an engineer.

    On the commercial side, 102.9 KNBQ broadcasts from Cap Peak, whereas KOMO-FM 97.7 and KDDS 99.3 both broadcast from South Mountain. Note that both 99.3 and 97.7 are class C north of the border frequencies; 102.9 is not. In my location just N and E of Seattle, 102.9 is unlistenable, the other two are “OK” if not swell.

    #1527
    Craig_Adams
    Participant

    This from All Access:


    FCC Denies Challenges To Washington State AMs


    The FCC has denied four challenges to the power increase and new tower array at S-R BROADCASTING CO., INC. Sports KRKO-A/EVERETT, WA. The objections by STEWARDS OF THE LAND AND COMMUNITY, PILCHUK AUDUBON SOCIETY, CITIZENS TO PRESERVE THE UPPER SNOHOMISH VALLEY, and ROBERT AND ANGELA DAY were based on environmental concerns and, in additional counts rejected as being raised as prohibited new arguments on appeal, on the effect of the towers on migratory birds.

    At the same time, CITIZENS TO PRESERVE THE UPPER SNOHOMISH VALLEY’s objection to the grant to S-R sister CAAM PARTNERSHIP, LLC of a new AM in SNOHOMISH, WA (now KXXA-A) was also rejected both procedurally and on the merits.

    #1528
    e_dawg
    Participant

    I think the agreements between Industry-Canada and the FCC allows both countries stations to interfere each other. Take a look at Oak Harbor NEW FM allocation at 94.5 FM, CFBT has 60 cb contour right over Oak Harbor and the FCC allows this to happen? Also, between Bellingham, Wa and Vancouver, BC KISM 92.9 Bellingham is 1 channel adjacent to CKYE 93.1 Vancouver, KAFE 104.1 is 1 channel adjacent to CHHR 104.3 Vancouver, and KLYN 106.5 Lyden/Bellingham is 1 channel adjacent to CKAV-3 106.5 Vancouver. How could CTRC and the FCC allow this?

    #1529
    semoochie
    Participant

    The CRTC is only concerned about interference over Canadian soil.

    #1530
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Any proposed site within 320 km of the border must comply with international interference rules.

    There is a separate spacing table: See 73.207(b)(2) http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=4c9e24a82511b548400667812a20e5de&rgn=div8&view=text&node=47:4.0.1.1.2.2.1.6&idno=47

    Also

    Under the Canada-United States FM Broadcasting Agreement, domestic U.S. allotments and assignments within 320 kilometers (199 miles) of the common border must be separated from Canadian allotments and assignments by not less than the distances given in Table B, which follows. When applying Table B, U.S. Class C2 allotments and assignments are considered to be Class B; also, U.S. Class C3 allotments and assignments and U.S. Class A assignments operating with more than 3 kW ERP and 100 meters antenna HAAT (or equivalent lower ERP and higher antenna HAAT based on a class contour distance of 24 km) are considered to be Class B1.

    Also, in overlap situations there are different contours that are used. Instead of 100, 60, 54 & 40 dBu, what matters is 100, 60, 48 and 34 dBu.

    “I think the agreements between Industry-Canada and the FCC allows both countries stations to interfere each other.”

    Not really. It depends on whether it’s interference caused or received (meaning which contours are offending).

    Also, you can’t (repeat CAN NOT) examine international relationships without accounting for reserved frequencies and certain vacancies that must be respected as if they were fully operating full power within their class stations. In addition, the international rules have changed, and those stations already operating are grandfathered in even if they don’t meet the new restrictions (but no complaints are filed), but when you make a change of location or power/class, you are subject to the latest version of the rules.

    If I can find my notes about Canadian/US interference I’ll add later what I am not remembering, but suffice it to say it’s a lot more complicated than US/US compliance. A lot more complicated. Mexico is worse.

    #1531
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Here’s an application I did within the 320 km limit that succeeded in getting licensed that has some Canadian influence on ERP. If you’re thinking a US application can propose pushing the 60 dBu right to the border and ignoring the repercussion(s) of overlapping contours of lesser strength, you would be sadly mistaken.

    https://licensing.fcc.gov/cgi-bin/ws.exe/prod/cdbs/forms/prod/cdbsmenu.hts?context=25&appn=101222937&formid=340&fac_num=174175

    https://licensing.fcc.gov/cdbs/CDBS_Attachment/getattachment.jsp?appn=101222937&qnum=5140&copynum=1&exhcnum=1

    Still looking for the latest international agreement. It’s online somewhere.

    #1532
    Craig_Adams
    Participant

    Speaking of Canada, this from All Access:

    The CRTC approved CBC’s application to add a new low-power FM transmitter at WHITEHORSE, YUKON TERRITORY to rebroadcast CBC RADIO ONE affiliate CFWH/WHITEHORSE. The new transmitter, with 50 watts at 173.4 meters on 95.3 FM, will help resolve reception problems due to mountainous terrain along the ALASKA and KLONDIKE Highways since the station transitioned to the FM band.

    #1533
    semoochie
    Participant

    Andy, that looks like a broken propeller!

    #1534
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    😀

    #1535
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    I was trying to understand the unusual shape of the proposed KSVR pattern, until I reached the last two pages of the engineering report. The pattern is designed to protect the Canadian stations. That a station with an ERP of 330 Watts would require such an elaborate pattern demonstrates how crowded the band has become.

    #1536
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Actually, Alfredo, KSVU’s pattern is non directional. The propeller shape is a result of topography. The ERP though, is indeed set by the international co channel in Burnaby.

    I played with a directional antenna to try and increase coverage but Burnaby limits any further coverage to the west towards Sedro-Woolley where the 60 dBu could hope to pick up population count (very important in NCE competitive applications), but the only direction more power and a directional antenna would pick up had negligible pop count (southeast).

    The propeller pattern is the result of having to put the transmitter on the side of the steep slope just north of Hiway 20 a few miles west and slightly north of Concrete, WA. There were few options. It does give the college coverage in the valley that runs east west where some reasonable amounts of population actually live.

    #1537
    Dan Packard
    Keymaster

    Northwest Newsman Bill Wippel Dies

    http://www.seatacradio.com/blog/?p=23531

    #1538
    RadioBuggie
    Participant
    #1539
    Craig_Adams
    Participant

    This from All Access:


    Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame DJs Pat O’Day & Marco Collins Count Down Seattle’s Top Songs


    Generations collide as MARCO COLLINS invites fellow SEATTLE radio legend PAT O’DAY to co-host the “SEATTLE TOP 20 COUNTDOWN” on FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th at 3p (PT), when they showcase the most important songs to emerge from SEATTLE during their respective eras of the ’60s and the ’90s. COLLIN’s weekly online feature on JET CITY STREAM covers the best-selling albums from SEATTLE artists, based on local record store sales.

    With their influence on music separated by three decades, the two personalities’ expertise covers a lot of ground, particularly regarding SEATTLE’s contributions to contemporary music. O’DAY is a legendary promoter and DJ of the ’60s who worked with the like of JIMI HENDRIX, LED ZEPPELIN, THE ROLLING STONES and BOB DYLAN. Similarly, COLLINS helped bring bands like NIRVANA, PEARL JAM, BECK and WEEZER to national prominence, and generated early attention to the grunge genre that is a pillar of ’90s music.

    COLLINS is best known as the flagship DJ and MD at Alternative KNDD (107.7 THE END) during the ’90s grunge explosion. O’DAY is probably best known as the afternoon drive personality at Top 40 KJR-A in ’60s; he eventually became PD and GM. He later owned KYYX (FM 96.5 RADIO) in SEATTLE in the mid-’70s and early ’80s. COLLINS and O’DAY also have the distinct honor of being the only two DJs from the PACIFIC NORTHWEST to be included in the ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME.

    JET CITY STREAM emerged onto the SEATTLE Music scene on APRIL 11th, 2012 via the Internet at http://www.jetcitystream.com to support and celebrate local music, musicians and businesses with a unique, online digital entertainment platform.

Viewing 15 posts - 211 through 225 (of 452 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.