RIP Stan Freberg 88

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  • #9236
    stevewa
    Participant

    One of the great talents in the business. Basically invented the funny commercial. He also had a 15-week run taking over the Jack Benny timeslot on CBS radio, which he claimed to be the last network comedy show on the radio. The entire series was released on CD and cassette many years ago and included the original (censored) segment “Incident at Los Varoces” where feuding casino moguls end up blowing up the whole place with an H-bomb.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/04/07/398151455/stan-freberg-a-genius-of-american-advertising-dies

    #9249
    Randy_in_Eugene
    Participant

    I always thought if I ever met him in person I’d ask, “Now that you finally have Part 2 of “United States of America,” when might we expect the Clyde Ankle 10-CD box set?”

    #9257
    semoochie
    Participant

    I have that set. I’ll have to make of point of listening to it. At least, June Foray is still active.

    #9258
    msndrspdx
    Participant

    Stan was a man of many talents. He wrote classic TV and radio ads, wrote song parodies, too, and he had a razor sharp sense of humor.

    I owned the original 2-LP album “The Best of ‘The Stan Freberg Show'” that originally came out on Capitol. “The Incident at Los Voraces” is a hilarious, thought provoking take on the Sodom & Gomorrah tale. How do you “tear out the walls and make room for one million people”? How do you top a swimming pool so large you need a Coast Guard cutter to escort you to the other side? Great stuff.

    I also owned a copy of Stan’s best of Capitol LP, “A Child’s Garden of Freberg.” He wrote the liner notes for that one, too. It leads off with “St. George & The Dragon-Net,” still considered the best “Dragnet” put down ever made, and goes on from there. His parody of Elvis Presley’s “Heartbreak Hotel” is spot on. So is “Try,” done in the style of Johnnie Ray’s classic “Cry.” Stan gets serious for a few moments on “That’s My Boy,” one of three B-sides he included on the LP “because I felt sorry for them.” And he saves the best for last: “Rock Around Stephen Foster,” a medley of rocked-up Foster tunes during which he encourages the band to sound “more commercial”!

    Stan worked with legends like Daws Butler and June Foray. He was multitalented and was one of the funniest guys I’ve ever heard. He’ll be missed.
    b
    Best, Mike 😉

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