Question for the Class

This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Paul Tilton 3 weeks, 3 days ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #41812

    Screamer
    Participant

    For my job, I frequently have to drive across the state. As a radio junkie, I like to listen to local stations in the areas I go to. I ran across something that I found curious and I am hoping to wrap my little kitty brain around it.

    I won’t name the area I was in or the call letters of the stations involved as I don’t want to call someone out and cause a huge stir.

    I heard a primary station rebroadcast on a class A station in another town/market. This isn’t a translator, this is an actual class A licensed station. I had no idea such a thing was allowed. Is this a new/change in regulations? How common is this practice?

    Thanks in advance for your understanding and patience in my questions!

    #41814

    Broadway
    Participant

    Would be helpful if you “outed” the stations involved?

    #41815

    Screamer
    Participant

    I would rather not. I just wanted to know if the practice is even allowed. Seemed odd to me.

    #41819

    Randy_in_Eugene
    Participant

    It’s common, especially among 1st adjacent rimshots that have been moved into larger markets, or on co-channel class A’s. 98.8 San Francisco and 99.1 Santa Cruz/San Jose comes to mind, as do a pair of 103.1s in the LA area, and some in Phoenix. Eugene’s AM 840 and 1450 spent much of the last 10 years or so simulcasting to keep the 1450 license from expiring under various under-capitalized owners.

    #41824

    Screamer
    Participant

    Thanks, Randy. So, if it is a situation like that, does the primary station just run a legal with “Rebroadcast on ____ in _____” on their Primary or does the class A need to run their own, separate ID? I honestly don’t recall hearing a station ID for the class A when I was listening.

    #41825

    Randy_in_Eugene
    Participant

    They can either run separate IDs, or when multiple stations are identified out of one studio at the top of the hour they must include frequencies. A good example is OPB’s TOH ID of several stations.

    #41837

    Notalent
    Participant

    Would an example of that be Roseburg with more than one local FM having a second adjacent frequency re-transmitted at low power for a more solid signal in the downtown area which is a valley. The main signals pretty much fly right over. I’m talking about KKMX and KRSB, However the low powered stations are translators. Not sure if that’s what you meant by Class A.

    Also in Roseburg a private party owns translators that re-broadcast Eugene stations, they even go so far as selling and broadcasting local Roseburg commercials on the Eugene signals.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 1 week ago by  Notalent.
    #41839

    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Translators are all Class D (secondary service) and the I.D. rules for them are different than for any primary service station (Class A, B, C) or secondary non translator service (LPFM). The translator ID’s generally are executed by the station being rebroadcast but there are other ways to do it, but since almost no programming on a translator can be self originating, it’s usually done by the primary being rebroadcast as it is the easiest and cheapest solution.

    #41840

    Screamer
    Participant

    In this particular case, there is a Class A station essentially operating as a translator.

    #42112

    Paul Tilton
    Participant

    It is legal as long as both/all stations announce their legal ID. In the mid 90’s I was with “The Twins” out of Bend. It was a simulcast on Both KTWS-Bend and KTWI-Warm Springs. Once an hour our legal said something like “The Twins are 96.3 KTWI, Warm Springs and 98.3 KTWS, Bend”. We simulcast 24/7 except for a 15 minute local news block M-F for KTWI daily at noon. KTWI also had to maintain “a studio” in the city of license. The signal came in on a T1 to that studio and then was microwaved to the Warm Springs tower site. That studio had the rudimentary equipment needed for a live broadcast if needed (mainly for FCC compliance) as well as the stations public files, licenses, etc.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.