Oldies rule–Millenials' taste in music

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Alfredo_T 2 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #40874

    Jeffrey Kopp
    Participant

    Millennials prefer music from 20th century ‘golden age’ to the pop of today, research suggests

    Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2019/02/07/millennials-prefer-music-20th-century-golden-age-pop-today-research-reveals-8462993/?ito=cbshare

    #40875

    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    I can’t say I blame them. We’re currently going through probably one of the darkest, most moribund periods in popular music.

    Even as a Gen Y’er (the “forgotten” generation following X and preceding millennial that for whatever reason tends to get lumped in with the latter) and I’m sure Andy Brown will declare me his blood enemy for saying so, I’ll happily take oldies over much of the garbage that’s come out over the last 15-20 years. Then again, when I was in junior high and high school (1996-2002) oldies was considerably popular amongst my peer group. At that time you heard just as many radios playing 97.1 as there were KNRK or the remnants of KKRZ.

    Now GET OFF MY LAWN YOU GODDAMN KIDS!

    #40876

    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Hey no, you can have whatever label you like. I did once assume you were a little older than you are (that’s a compliment) because some of what you post reflects having been around a little longer than you have (or very well read).

    WRT to young folks liking music from the previous century, it comes as no surprise to me. Not only have I read that elsewhere, but it’s clear the majority of popular music being disseminated by streaming, radio and download sales ads all reflect corporate owned, corporate produced and corporate marketed computer created pop hits. Real musical talent is a little harder to find. It requires wading through the left end of the radio dial or combing through literally thousands of podcasts, etc. Only a small percentage of the truly best music from the last 25 years (lump it all up and call it post grunge if you need a label) can be found on main stream distributors be it radio, streaming or whatever. This will even out as you extend the range of years out. Heck, there wasn’t anywhere near as much music being published and performed in the 70’s and 80’s because of the expense of recording equipment before software and CD burners went ubiquitous. However, when there was less music available there still was a heavy percentage of crap. Now there is a whole hell of lot more available and still a heavy percentage of it is crap, so in raw numbers it is also true to say there has never been as much crap as there is circulating now. It used to be that you could go to the record store and see what people are buying but since Napster days that is no longer a complete solution. Before the 70’s, there was even less music being produced and a lot of it was jazz and classical because that group of listeners were the ones with money to buy them and the “new” high fidelity equipment being manufactured.

    Another way to observe this young folks/old music paradigm is to look at the vinyl titles being sold. According to Terry at the Music Millennium the twenty somethings are buying a lot of vinyl and the majority of it are pre Y2k titles. The hidden gem in that (if you hang out and watch what people are buying) is that the occasional newer title on vinyl making it to the cash register is usually something worth looking into.

    #40879

    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Hey no, you can have whatever label you like. I did once assume you were a little older than you are (that’s a compliment) because some of what you post reflects having been around a little longer than you have (or very well read).

    Actually I didn’t word that paragraph very clearly (I hadn’t had breakfast yet so I guess that was a reflection on how clearly I was thinking) but I meant with regard to liking 50s/60s/70s oldies vs. my generation’s or the present generation’s stuff. Cnsidering some of the opinions you’ve stated about oldies of that era on here in the past, e.g. in the KISN revival discussions.

    Yeah, that era did have a lot of crap but they weren’t as oversaturated with it as the past 20 years or so have gotten. Widespread Internet access and easy availability of cheap technology has made it possible for any talentless hack with a pulse, a Youtube account and a desire for 10 minutes of stardom to readily put out content and get widespread attention on social media. Witness, for example, Adele or Lady GagMe, or Imagining Dragons. This is the era when any teenager with a $12/hour minimum wage job at McDumbfuck’s, if they really had the desire to, could essentially go to the local geek shop and grab a surplus PC for a dollar then get on Amazon and buy a few pieces of Chinese audio equipment, and build a nearly professional-grade recording studio in the corner of their bedrooms and start grinding out derivative sampled rubbish for maybe $300 tops. 50 years ago, if today’s technology were available for the prices it’s at, big record execs/big media corporations who controlled music would have been collectively shitting their pants.

    It’s a relative circle. The proportion of crap to good stuff is dependent on access to technology in a given era. Like you said, there wasn’t as much stuff in circulation back then because technology was expensive and hard to come by. A radio on every kid’s belt versus an entire radio market in everybody’s pocket.

    Erm, sorry, long day. I’m rambling. But I think that’s kind of the gist of it.

    #40881

    semoochie
    Participant

    ” (the “forgotten” generation following X and preceding millennial that for whatever reason tends to get lumped in with the latter)” I thought that “millennial” was a replacement name for “Generation Y” and completely synonymous!

    #40884

    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Wikipedia’s definition says that the Millennial generation and Generation-Y are the same thing. The birth years are approximately 1980-1995. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millennials

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