Okay now is it over

Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #48196
    fatb0y2011
    Participant

    For the most part I will go with Andy’s take on this thread. I can remember some very fun times doing “Valley Country”, in the morning on KSRV-AM and mid-days on sister KXBQ-FM in little ‘ole Ontario, Oregon back in the 80’s.
    Great bunch of guys working for us. Yeah we voice tracked both stations, but we learned all sorts of tricks to make it sound relatable, local and fun. We encouraged each other and didn’t tolerate any of that “This is…. or That was… bullshit.
    I can’t now believe how much we all wanted to get to the “major markets” to finally make money and “arrive”.
    Year’s later I’m another one of those “chewed-up-and-spit-out” by the likes of that broadcast abomination iheart.
    (Can’t quite figure out why the Obama Administration didn’t straighten all that Reagan stuff out. Oh well.)
    Anyways…I do think there are pros still enjoying this little speed-of-light communication miracle we now take for granted. (Love these guys! Wish the KISN RF Cabal could get it together this way http://sunradio.com/)
    Can’t really find anything wrong with making a living doing what you love to do. Just not sure that will ever happen again in commercial radio.
    Guess it will just be us old farts wheeling our chairs around the rest home calling in requests to our little carrier current station. It’d be cool since we’ll probably wake up every day hearing the same playlist like it was the first time!

    #48199
    Screamer
    Participant

    <<Can’t really find anything wrong with making a living doing what you love to do. Just not sure that will ever happen again in commercial radio.>>

    I think that goes back to my point about Eugene. I believe there have to be locally-owned groups in Eugene that must be profitable. Would it be a lucrative, major-market living? Likely not. When I make my trips to Salem and Corvallis for work, I’m listening to the locally owned stations because they seem to outclass the corporate groups in the market. (Save KZEL and KLOO, I know those aren’t locally-owned, but I like how they sound and are run.)

    #48203
    saveit
    Participant

    I don’t know when it happened, but it appears that Cooper Banks is also gone from KXL.

    Maybe if Lars Larson and John Canzano took pay cuts maybe some others could stay. Oh that’s to obvious.

    #48206
    semoochie
    Participant

    Fatboy, why in the world would you want to destroy a perfectly decent station and replace it with that? The playlist is all over the board and mostly little known music, over a 60 year period. It belongs online. I can’t imagine anyone listening for very long!

    #48236
    Greg_Charles
    Participant

    Screamer:
    “I think that goes back to my point about Eugene. I believe there have to be locally-owned groups in Eugene that must be profitable. Would it be a lucrative, major-market living? Likely not.”

    I haven’t checked recently, but McKenzie River Broadcasting has dominated both in sales and Neilsen ratings for decades. While spring 22.2 McKenzi compared to 19.5 Bicostal doesn’t look very dominating, look further at the age demographics and then sales revenue for each group. Demographics with money and sales is what counts.

    There really is no secret. Treat your employees right. Company river raft outings and fun staff events. Do a TON of local music research. Keep the best engineer who in the 70’s made 5K watts KBDF sound louder than 50k watts KPNW happy. Provide plenty of incentives for sales. Promote and advertise your cluster. Bob & John fled pdx in the 80s and purchased 94.5 KBMC (christian blocked programming) for peanuts. There was really not much other than the value of the frequency when they came to town.

    As far as it being lucrative major market living, I’m guessing there are a few at McKenzie earning substantially more than their peers in pdx, however that is just a guess.

    #48254
    fatb0y2011
    Participant

    Well framed:
    “There really is no secret. Treat your employees right. Company river raft outings and fun staff events. Do a TON of local music research. Keep the best engineer who in the 70’s made 5K watts KBDF sound louder than 50k watts KPNW happy. Provide plenty of incentives for sales. Promote and advertise your cluster. Bob & John fled pdx in the 80s and purchased 94.5 KBMC (christian blocked programming) for peanuts. There was really not much other than the value of the frequency when they came to town.”

    #48260
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Great input from a lot of folks and it’s worth mentioning that radio broadcasting in “college towns” is somewhat unique, especially when they are in smaller than huge standalone markets. It’s an outgrowth from the 60s when small class D college and university stations robbed the commercial stations of a big chunk of their audience forcing them to get with it or become a fossil. That’s why prog rock stations flourished in the 70s. Then the greed took over in the 80s with Reagan destroying the ownership rules and the birth of mega owners and the proliferation of automation and voice tracking. The curve of growth of that was slow until the ’96 changes turned radio on its head and it has never really recovered. It’s hard to put a date or even a year that would work for the great implosion, but when the two biggest mega owners find themselves bankrupt, you can conclude that their methods failed to sustain radio at all. Now we are left with a bucket of broken pieces and for some of us, memories of how it used to be. The fact is, it could be that way again but it would mean changing the architecture of the industry which is a tall order.

    #48338
    johnlaw
    Participant

    Agree with Paul Walker. Just a sad state of affairs. Guess I’m grateful that when growing up in the Seattle area, I just KNEW I would work in commercial radio. For 6 years, I did just that. Got paid to play records(!) and listen to the sound of my own voice. Wasn’t always the dream world I had envisioned – but still got to live it for awhile. Lots of good memories and gathered some great stories along the way. Now I’m just hunkered down in the Portland area, happily semi-retired, working on my golf game and blues guitar playing. Works for me.

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