Okay now is it over

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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  • #47901
    saveit
    Participant

    Where is local radio going?

    99.5 The Wolf after 10 am is all syndicated. The same number of commercials, but the income received must be way down.

    This is not going to work. I already can listen online across the country, or better yet to Pandora.

    #47904
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Sadly, hasn’t this become quite standard? If any slot has live people, it is morning drive. Everything else is syndicated or the work of Otto Mation.

    #47908
    Notalent
    Participant
    #47932
    fieldstrength
    Participant

    KNRK 94.7 has removed ALL of it’s local personalities. A month ago they were local and mostly live all day, but now not a single voice is local.

    Greg, Pepper, and Derrick were all let go a few weeks ago. Now it’s been announced today that Gustav as also left.

    #47941
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    “Where is local radio going?”

    To the left end of the dial, mostly, with a few LPFMs sprinkled on some of the secondary channels in the non reserved band not to be mistaken with the translators carrying other syndicated trash.

    The government has hijacked the public’s bandwidth in other bands more directly, that is, they just throw licensees off and (re)auction it off to a new bunch of big corporations. In the broadcast bands, it is more surreptitious. The public’s interest is still being served, supposedly, but you know that it isn’t when the same huge corporation holds 6 or more licenses in the same market across both commercial bands. That led to the loss of millions of radio jobs and the loss of diversity of ownership which translates to the loss of diversity of programming. But no one was “forced” to turn over their license, they were just either offered so much money they couldn’t refuse selling to Chump Channel (now iHurt) or Cumulust or they could no longer compete with multi station advertising packages that give buyers of ads large advantages. So, in other words, the government made the commercial broadcast business solely focused on advertisers and group owners with no consideration for small single licensee owners trying to serve a small community. Didn’t I post this a hundred times over the last 12 years or so right here on this forum? Right now, the barriers to entry for a broadcast start up are higher than ever. EVER! You need a ton of money behind you and lots of patience, a good signal, and a tireless staff of professionals whom you can afford to pay well. If you have those qualities, you can wrestle a station with potential away from the bankrupt or failing groups but it won’t be cheap or in a top 12 market. Remember, no one wanted to buy the Warm Springs station when they moved it to Portland. It sat there for several years before being assimilated under an LMA.

    It just currently takes too much money to even consider competing against the monster the government has allowed to evolve. You can go small, but stations in the boonies are hurting, too. They’re cheaper to get and in most cases cheaper to operate, but revenues of any significance are not part of the sale. Why do you think some of those mini stations are looking for a buyer? Somebody is tired of carrying the financial load. You don’t have to go too far out of this market to see that. Hillsboro comes to mind. Kelso. Salem.

    #47942
    Borderblaster
    Participant

    #47947
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    I’ve wondered, how many of the people at the “left end of the FM dial” stations are paid for what they do? Are KMHD air personalities paid (I don’t know)? Are KQAC air personalities paid? (Again, I don’t know.) In the 1990s, I was affiliated with a “left end of the dial” station that was owned by a university, and nobody was paid to run the board there.

    #47950
    semoochie
    Participant

    Maybe, they just weren’t paying you and everyone else was covering up. 🙂

    #47951
    paulwalker
    Participant

    30 years ago I was working at KPLZ in Seattle where every airshift, including overnights and weekends were live. Even 20 years ago there was mostly live shifts on almost all local radio stations in any medium or major market. Ten years ago we saw most stations run a local morning show. It is amazing how this has developed since 1990. Not that it wasn’t predicted. It was. Current events are accelerating this now. For those hoping we will ever go back to those days will be sadly disappointed. But life moves on, albeit with less joy IMO on this subject.

    #47952
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Greed killed radio, not MTV. Unmitigated, blatant and obvious greed. Fuck, it’s our bandwidth. I want it back.

    #48050
    drchaps
    Participant

    I guess Dan purged the ranks a while back. Hi y’all!

    This is a sad day. Or period of time. The new morning 94/7 guy is unbearable. I miss Gustav, I miss Squid (although I can get a personal session on Trimet), I miss hearing the PD, I miss Greg, I miss something local.

    This is the industries last attempt at profitability. We are spoiled to have Alpha here, but even they bring in shows like Brooke and Jeffery. I wonder how much voice tracking they do for the rest of the country out of here.

    Too leveraged, too short sighted. Hello podcasts and spotify.

    #48051
    Screamer
    Participant

    I wish a couple of the Eugene broadcasters were owners up here. And yes, I get it, there is no way any of those owners could afford to be on in this market. It is just sad when you have better radio (and local owners) in the smaller markets.

    #48052
    Borderblaster
    Participant

    Jack FM Playing What We Want

    #48193
    Bob
    Participant

    For rock, I like 106.3FM KLOO out of Corvallis.
    Great playlist-Diverse with enough hits for most.
    Beats what’s played throughout much of the state.

    #48194
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    “It is just sad when you have better radio (and local owners) in the smaller markets.”

    It’s always been that way. There’s fewer local owners nowadays, so it’s even more pronounced when a smaller market station does an infinitely better job than in the big markets because the big markets are now exclusively dominated by corporate owners and the crap they broadcast.

    This came about starting in the 70’s when smaller market owners would hear what a great job the progressive FMs of the 70s were doing and copied their approach in the small markets. The big market FMs changed radically beginning in the 80s due to Reagan and his administration upsetting the status quo and beginning the destruction of the ownership limits. The notion of good radio still exists in the LPFMs (some, not all) and the small independently owned stations in the smaller markets. Big corporate FMs in the big markets no longer feel a need to serve the public and operate totally different than even 25 years ago.

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