Neat – Received CKWX 1130AM in my Subaru Forester in Downtown Portland!

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  dialtwirler 1 week, 3 days ago.

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  • #42840

    I’ve never experienced such signal propagation in the Portland Metropolitan area (driving along the coastal highways, most definitely though) but enjoyed a taste of 1130AM, CKWX.

    Was this rare, or is anyone else able to receive this under fairly ordinary conditions?

    #42841

    semoochie
    Participant

    CKWX used to be a given every night. Has something changed?

    #42844

    Borderblaster
    Participant

    If some Asian-Pacific station on 747 kc ever broke through, the locals would shit their pants. roflol

    #42845

    Broadway
    Participant

    In Salem at night we get—
    KXET-AM 1130 kHz Mount Angel

    #42846

    semoochie
    Participant

    KXET sends its signal away from Portland at night to protect CKWX. There isn’t much up here but I believe Salem is within both coverage patterns.

    #42847

    Ahh – nothing special, then.

    I enjoy the AM radio propagation at night in the coastal mountains – have experienced plenty of Bay Area radio stations then but nothing in Portland proper.

    When will local AM radio be desperate enough to give Rick Emerson a program again? 😉

    #42855

    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    I hear a fairly good signal from CKWX in Hillsboro. 690, the other Vancouver frequency with a high-powered station, is an absolute pile-up on the other hand. A few minutes ago, I was simultaneously hearing CBC radio, a station broadcasting a program in what I think was Mandarin, and some other stuff.

    Perhaps 1130 should be added to my radio presets. As the days get shorter, if I set the clock radio to 1130, I can wake up to news from CKWX. If I sleep in too late, I will be woken up by Russians.

    #42858

    paulwalker
    Participant

    I have noted that Fall is the perfect season for DX’ing, especially late Fall. But the power changes on AM’s, or lack of them, can be quite interesting as the daylight decreases.

    When I lived in Idaho years ago I could pull in so many western signals as the sun was going down…KOA Denver, KSL Salt Lake, of course the usual KGO and KNBR Bay Area, but also KFI and KNX Los Angeles, and a bevy of Canadian signals as well. Too bad the AM band is slowly being phased out for the most part. An era that will soon be unimportant.

    #42860

    dialtwirler
    Participant

    The Chinese language station on 690 is undoubtedly XEWW-AM, a powerful Tijuana, Mexico, station that broadcasts to the Southern California market.

    When conditions are right, on 690 you can also hear CBKF1 Gravelbourg, Saskatchewan. It is a member of the CBC French language “Premiere Chaine” network.

    It sounds kind of strange to hear English, Chinese and French all at the same time on one frequency.

    #42861

    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Just minutes after my last posting, I heard the XEWW ID in Spanish.

    #42868

    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Re: the sarcastic comments above about Asia-Pacific stations on 747 kHz

    There have been some winter nights that the carriers from overseas stations have become strong enough to detect without any special equipment. The last time that I had one of these encounters was about two years ago. I was listening to KOMO on a car radio (in other words a receiving setup that is almost non-directional), and I started to hear a faint whistle that slowly changed in loudness. 999 kHz is a frequency used in the Asian/European bandplan. I checked a few other dial positions where the closest Asian stations would be 1 or 2 kHz away (for instance 1010 kHz/1008 kHz), and on many of these frequencies, I heard heterodynes that sounded about right in pitch. I do not recall being able to hear 3 kHz heterodynes, and this was likely due to the car radio’s narrow frequency response. Human hearing is, in theory, supposed to be more sensitive at 3 kHz than at 1 kHz.

    To have a good chance of hearing Asian stations on the AM band, one would need a Beverage antenna. Unfortunately, I do not have enough real estate to erect such an antenna, and the layout of my lot is wrong (the yard is to the east of the house, rather than west). There are some Asian stations, such as one in North Korea, with transmitter powers approaching one million Watts, so hearing these stations doesn’t seem that improbable, if one can sufficiently attenuate the interfering North American signals.

    * I had a hearing test around the same time, and somewhere, I have the sensitivity and frequency response plots from it. In my recollection, I was surprised to see that around 2.5 kHz, I approached 0 dB sensitivity. The overall shape of the curves approached the classic Fletcher-Munson curves that one sees in textbooks.

    #42869

    dialtwirler
    Participant

    You can find reports of reception of Asian AM stations (including many from Pacific Northwest DXers) at the International Radio Club of America board:

    https://groups.io/g/IRCA/messages?p=created,0,,20,2,0,0

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