MeTV Music on 104.5

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  • #46210
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Shallow?

    3000 selections is a pretty deep library compared to the shitty 60-100 selection rotations that most of the big-money corporate FMs limit themselves to. Even Muzak’s “Foreground Music One” format includes only around 500 selections these days (no thanks to Soundexchange) which for what it is is quite paltry compared to what it was just a few years ago (if that makes any sense*) but is still pretty huge compared to late 2010s Big Media radio.

    * This will not be on the exam.

    #46211
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    I commend MeTV if it can successfully rotate 3,000 songs without alienating listeners. In the 1990s, I volunteered at a university radio station that boasted about how much music was in its library. In my recollection, they claimed something insane like 3,000 CDs and 30,000 LPs. However, that music had been accumulated over a period of over two decades. Most of it just sat on the shelves and was never used on the air. There were many, many old LPs that sounded extremely dated from the perspective of the station’s focus on contemporary music. There were also a variety of really obscure or novelty acts that would have been considered “crap.” Did anyone here know that the man who claimed to bend spoons with his mind, Uri Geller, made an album? More isn’t always better.

    Even though we largely stuck to playing the most audience-accessible material from our library, students still routinely complained that the station sucked because its programming approach was too slapdash and not sufficiently accessible.

    #46212
    semoochie
    Participant

    As absurd as this sounds, I stand before you today to say that when Uri Geller was a guest on KKEY, he told people that he was going to bend keys and keys that were not previously bent, including mine, were bent, while Geller was there and returned to not being bent, after he left! I absolutely did not believe it before it happened and still wonder what actually occurred. Soon after that, The Amazing Randy was on to debunk Geller and was unsuccessful.

    #49925
    fieldstrength
    Participant

    Has anyone been able to hear KXXP over the last couple of weeks? At least from the Portland area, they seem to be off the air, or perhaps at low enough power that it does not reach the west side like it usually does. I’m assuming they took on damage during the ice storm and haven’t been able to make repairs. The storm must have been pretty harsh on Mt. Defiance.

    #49928
    semoochie
    Participant

    I went out to the car, rolled back and forth and heard “I Walk the Line”. No one else could possibly be playing that, so it must be them. I tried three other radios in the house and got nothing.

    #49939
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    On the West Side, KXXP is almost unlistenable. They must be at very low power, and in my recollection, they have been this way since the Presidents’ Day storm. In a vehicle, the signal goes from occasionally popping in to fading beneath the noise floor. I will have to spin the Yagi at home to see what else (if anything) can be received on the frequency.

    The KXXP experience reminds me of a time in the spring of 1997 when a roommate and I were driving from Binghamton to Rochester, New York. He pointed out how on a number of spots on the FM dial, two or more transmitters could be heard fighting for control of the frequency. He observed that 20 years prior, we would have just heard just one station fading into the noise floor when driving into such rural areas. 104.5 seems to be one of the very few places left on the FM dial in the Portland area where this still happens.

    #49940
    semoochie
    Participant

    You might try Seattle. It’s a C2 but you never know.

    #49941
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    He pointed out how on a number of spots on the FM dial, two or more transmitters could be heard fighting for control of the frequency. He observed that 20 years prior, we would have just heard just one station fading into the noise floor when driving into such rural areas. 104.5 seems to be one of the very few places left on the FM dial in the Portland area where this still happens.

    Didja see the last few minutes of shango’s Youtube posting where he resurrected the Hitachi TV? Worth a look.

    This is why a miliwatt adjacent-channel free speech/underground FM will never cause significant (if any) interference to any multi-megawatt flamethrower no matter how much big money radio (including NPR) want to scream blue murder otherwise. Those who think they do either are motivated by greed or have no understanding of FM radio physics (or both).

    I await you guys’ flames, contradictory arguments and low-IQ personal attacks proving my point.

    #49943
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Most likely, the big-money non-profit station will be transmitting IBOC, and these digital sidebands will handily wipe out the “milliwatt adjacent-channel free speech/underground FM.”

    The Sylvan Hills antenna farm is due east from my location near downtown Hillsboro. Using a log-Yagi, I noted that the signal strength on 104.5 peaks with the antenna pointed roughly NE. I also see some other smaller peaks in signal strength; in my recollection, one is roughly to the south and another is to the west. I suspect that these are reflections from mountains. The strong signals from the West Hills cause intermodulation problems if I point the antenna due east.

    #49981
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    As of Sunday, 104.5 is back to normal strength.

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