MeTV Music on 104.5

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 33 total)
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  • #43829
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    I sampled their stream at http://metv.fm/kxxp and I wasn’t impressed.

    Not really my cup of tea as far as an oldies/classic hits format.

    Direct stream link (AAC): https://ice9.securenetsystems.net/KXXP

    Would you rather have yet another POS bible-thumper or KXRY translator?

    #43833
    Screamer
    Participant

    <<Would you rather have yet another POS bible-thumper or KXRY translator?>>

    If it does flip to one of those, it will happen if we like it or not.

    What I would ‘rather’ have is a station programmed and staffed by people living in Portland (or Gresham, or Beaverton or somewhere in the metro), who actually care about local listener tastes, and programs to what people want here … and not just another over-researched pile of radio waves with bland and unimaginative production, spoon-feeding the same crap. That is what I would ‘rather’ have. But my opinion doesn’t matter because I don’t have 20-30 mil for my own signal.

    #43838
    semoochie
    Participant

    Actually, they should probably be super-serving their 70dbu or at least 60dbu contour, which is not Portland.

    #43844
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Although I have expressed that I have found the new format on 104.5 more palatable than what was on the frequency before, I must also say, who cares what any single person wants? The WXXP license allows the station to be operated by a for-profit business. This means that any staff working in any capacity for the station have to be paid. The station’s owners will do what it takes to cover their operating expenses. If that means running a syndicated format 24/7, that’s what we’ll hear.

    #43846
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    What I would ‘rather’ have is a station programmed and staffed by people living in Portland (or Gresham, or Beaverton or somewhere in the metro), who actually care about local listener tastes, and programs to what people want here … and not just another over-researched pile of radio waves with bland and unimaginative production, spoon-feeding the same crap. That is what I would ‘rather’ have.

    Well, you’re probably not going to get that any more these days:

    Although I have expressed that I have found the new format on 104.5 more palatable than what was on the frequency before, I must also say, who cares what any single person wants? The WXXP license allows the station to be operated by a for-profit business.

    Exactly. So screamer, consider the more realistic things that it just as easily could have been, be thankful that it’s not, enjoy what you have (while you have it) and don’t complain. The alternative could have been much worse.

    #43857
    Screamer
    Participant

    I’m old and I can complain if I want to. Just ask Andy. We disagree on stuff but I don’t hold any animosity. I know he has a million times more engineering knowledge than I do. He puts me in my place and I am fine with it. Programming and production wise, I’ll still put my old chops against anyone. If I had the money for a station or even a lpfm, I would absolutely put my money where my mouth was and let you complain about my programming – and let my ratings speak for themselves.

    #43858
    russell-curry
    Participant

    I gather KXXP is a relay of WRME in Chicago, at 87.7. What exactly are these 87.7 stations? Are they seen as FM band pirates, or actual TV stations?

    #43861
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    “What exactly are these 87.7 stations?”

    LPTV licensees on Channel 6 can put any audio they want on the air and put up a slide or color bars to complete their legal obligation to broadcast “video.” Three big problems though.

    1. Modulation in NTSC audio is limited to 50 kHz deviation, not 75 kHz like FM analog radio. This means there is inferior S/N even when it is a loud passage. I guess it might be OK for heavy metal but jazz or classical would sound like crap.

    2. Soon (two more years sometime in late 2021?) all LPTV stations must be digital. Most already are, but once that sunset comes around, they will not be able to broadcast a carrier at 87.75.

    3. Not all digital FM tuners go that low. Older analog tuners usually do, but at this point there aren’t many cars out there with analog tuners. My sled is 21 years old and it has a digital tuner and it doesn’t go down below 88.1 MHz.

    Pirates generally avoid going at 87.75 because so few people can actually receive it and wouldn’t be able to find it by scanning or seeking on a typical FM receiver.

    #43862
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    :“and let you complain about my programming – and let my ratings speak for themselves.”

    People will always complain about programming. It doesn’t matter what you play, who your target demo is, how experienced the programmer/DJ is or how smooth the presentation is.

    As far as “ratings” go, they’re phony. I’ve said this before. Ratings are a mathematical device created by the broadcast industry for the broadcast industry. They are not an accurate representation of what stations people are listening to, on what days, at what times and for how long. It’s as phony as Milli Vanilli. Stations that invest money into ratings will generally show up in a favorable light within the ratings somewhere. Stations that don’t won’t. Corporate ad buyers use these ratings to determine who’s best serving their target demos and buy time accordingly. That’s what makes ratings relevant but it in no way makes them accurate or even reliable. Sure, there are a few in the crowd that will try to defend the ratings, both in the old “book” days or in the new “meter” days, but frankly, ratings are bullshit. It’s just part of the corporate crap that has taken over a huge portion of the radio dial. Stations (before 1996) could show big profits and have no sellable ratings and others could have ratings and still not make a profit (usually because they spend too much promotional monies to get those ratings, including the portion being paid to Nielsen just to get “in”). Sadly, there are many good radio people, veterans of decades of radio programming, promotion and presentation (DJ) whom thought ratings were reality until they got axed. But enough about radio sales and its magic act. I like to spend time discussing why programming is so frikkin’ lost these days.

    The short answer is that radio ignored the internet when it first started to become ubiquitous. During the 90’s radio and television scoffed at the entire computer revolution. The bigger the corporation, the more in denial they were. Then came Napster and the clear downward trend in money being spent on stored music product. The musicians were the first to feel it. The business model was basically turned upside down. No longer was a hit record worth all that much in dollars. Great exposure, sure, but the only way to make a buck was performance income. Sure the Rolling Stones could make a little money on a new album, but there were few exceptions like that. The very corporate stations that did not see the net as a threat were the same ones buying up Dells and Compaqs and filling their offices with copies of Lotus 1-2-3 and dBase III. Printed memos became dinosaurs and the boss would interact with his slaves by intranet email. Meanwhile artists like Todd Rundgren were diving in to computer videos and digital audio. TV stations were spending millions on digital weather forecasting packages that fit into the analog delivery system but still reticent to dive in whole hog . . . because no one else was doing it. I mean that’s how things work in television. Radio is not much better. Again, the best engineering advice in the universe couldn’t penetrate the thick skulls of management even though large scale integration was making systems smaller, more versatile and more easily integrated into the legacy environment. Until the HDTV bomb dropped, that is. Sure, most of those old fogies are pushing up daisies these days, but the new generation of ownership in broadcasting is flawed in other ways. When the message finally got to them, they bought in to and/or supported more automation (to reduce payroll), cheaper distribution of syndication and network programming using the internet and VPN technology (to reduce payroll), consolidation of ownership both nationwide and intra market (to reduce payroll) and totally threw out the notion that the bandwidth is owned by the people and that they are only licensed to serve the public.

    So how does that add up to programming being “lost” you might ask. That’s a longer explanation but suffice it to say that when an “emerging” artist is developed by corporate interests, recorded by and at the corporate interest’s own studios and facilities, promoted by the same company’s marketing division and placed on the corporate playlist for all their stations . . . something is lost. A big something.

    The advancement of technology has allowed many many more creative content developers to jump in the game. From the band in the garage making their own music masters and rolling their music out on the internet with no record contract, no marketing machine and no national tour all planned out and funded. Guess what, it is working for the best of those folks. Meanwhile the corporate sloths roll out the latest pablum they’ve developed be it music or t.v. programming and just assume people will absorb it. Face it, there is so much media out there today it’s unfathomable. Let’s be for real about this, too, because it is coming at the expense of jobs and income so the big and powerful remain that way.

    If you still want to make a difference, do what I do. If you’re not known, make yourself known. Work your old contacts. Volunteer where it’s appropriate. There are still some media adventures left to be taken.

    Personally, and it’s true probably across the board, old engineers aren’t much in demand anymore but I got into the game because of the music. The good music. Not the crap that occupies a large portion of the airwaves today. So every week I produce a three hour radio show for my alma mater’s radio station that I helped launch back in the old days. It’s in a market where I worked not only at the aforementioned NCE but commercially, too. Some of my audience is from back in those days. I constantly throw in deep cuts from those days and trust me, most of those tunes you never hear on the radio these days. I cover over 70 years of recorded music. Just the other day I was highlighting Huddie Ledbetter (Lead Belly) on his birthday and playing some of his originals and then playing what modern bands have done with them (The Legend Of The Titanic, Cotton Fields, Black Betty and Gallows Pole). In the same show I paid tribute to Neil Peart (pronounced like ‘ear’ with a P and a T, not like the shampoo ‘ert’) with 11 tracks, mostly non “hits” that showcase either his drumming or his lyrics. Let me tell you, it was a blast. I was mentally exhausted after recording that since I do it straight through, mixing the music manually and reading copy I have written before the show. Then I go through and do as little editing as I can so it doesn’t sound anything but real. Let me tell you, though, it’s cheap therapy for me. I created a facebook page for it and service that weekly and post my playlists. I don’t know how many listeners I have either on air or on line, but folks are reading my playlists when I post them. Bottom line, you can be involved. I just can’t recommend going down the broadcast career path anymore, at least not at this point.

    #43863
    jr_tech
    Participant

    Are archives of “Return to South Mountain” available on line?

    #43867
    semoochie
    Participant

    In 1980, KKEY tied KMJK for fifth and never subscribed to a ratings service. Of course, they couldn’t use the results anyway.

    #43881
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Re: Archives

    Not yet. They’re supposed to be doing that. I’ve got them archived here at home.

    #46199
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    You have the masters and bandwidth (presumably) so you could probably open an account on archive.org and upload them yourself. Because, fuck Youtube and social media websites, and waiting for other people to get around to doing it. Want to get your stuff out there these days in a timely fashion, you have to do it yourself.

    That’s how I’d do it, anyways.

    #46200
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    It’s not about that. It’s about publishing and performance rights. Not to mention rebroadcast permission.

    #46203
    chessyduck
    Participant

    Officially, KXXP is carrying a Sun Broadcast Group’s “MeTV FM” syndicated format. Besides Chicago’s “Franken FM” WRME-LP, the format is heard in Plattsburgh NY- Burlington VT (WXZO) and La Crosse WI (KQEG). For more details see: https://sunbgi.com/programming/metv-fm/

    The format is not bad but the playlist remains fairly shallow at just 3,000 songs. Besides taking audience from KBPS, there’s certainly a lot of music overlap with WORC’s two LPFMs.

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by chessyduck.
    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by chessyduck.
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