Meter Readings

This topic contains 10 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  semoochie 1 month, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #42307

    Broadway
    Participant

    When I got my FCC 3rd Class Endorsed license it gave me the authority to take Transmitter readings every 30 minutes/hourly back in 1971 at my first radio gig. Sometime in the early-mid 80’s we got a Burk Systems to monitor…connected to a printer and the printer spat out the readings every hour or so…my question…when did this get all deregulated into what it is today…any other timelines in memory?

    #42308

    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    1995: The FCC adopted a docket permitting stations to operate without staff monitoring the transmitter (see https://www.fcc.gov/media/radio/unattended-operation ).

    1997: EAS replaced EBS.

    #42311

    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Sometime around 1972 or 1973 the transmitter meters requirement was relaxed from hourly to every two hours. AM directional antenna base current meters at the tower were relaxed to twice daily (most stations had the evening FCRTO read them once and the overnight FCRTO read them once) although remote antenna readings, like the transmitter readings, were every two hours. Where I worked (studio at antennae site) the “remote” antenna readings were right there at the transmitter, transmitter readings were taken right on the transmitter’s meters. Antenna “remote” metering allowed for current and phase and you logged them on an old typewriter on a rack shelf right there. Very convenient. I used to look forward to reading the tower meters since it allowed me to get some fresh air and take a walk. Minimum required 15 minute song and don’t forget the keys or you’re locked out! Once the sun came up and you went ND, the indoor ND reading at the common point and the transmitter readings were all that was required.

    #42314

    Steve Naganuma
    Participant

    Back in the 1970s, 10Q in Los Angeles turned the switch to the night time antenna pattern into an on-air bit. I am sure the general public listening had no idea what they were talking about.

    http://www.mediafire.com/file/6znk2edjl4z/NightTimePattern10Q.mp3/file

    #42319

    paulwalker
    Participant

    I got my 3rd class in the mid-70’s. Was turned down for some jobs for not getting my 1st class. Was only an issue early in my radio career, late 70’s/early 80’s. Seemed to disappear after that.

    Had to go to downtown Seattle at the Federal Building for the test, which was pretty easy as I recall. The 1st was much more difficult as I understood it.

    #42320

    semoochie
    Participant

    I got my 3rd phone when I was still in high school. After I entered college, they changed the test for the broadcast endorsement but not the study materials. No one in my class could get through it. I went to Ron Bailie for the 1st and 2nd phone. You had to memorize 571 questions and answers for the 2nd phone and 351 for the 1st. When you do it that way, it’s called a “First Phoney”. After going through all of that for the 2nd phone, the 1st was a piece of cake. I have no doubt that I got all the answers correct.

    #42323

    tombrooks
    Participant

    Reading Andy, Steve and Semoochie reminded me of my first almost job. Going to Benson KBPS and answering the KISN request lines nights.. I would use the KISN production room to practice being a DJ…somehow I got hired over the phone to do weekends at KGAL in Albany/Lebanon..drove down one Satu Morning for my first day on the job – The PD Sowed me the Format Clock, some equipment to use and “here is where you hang your license”…1st Class license..which I didn’t have only 3rd…No Job…lol.. Oh the fun times in radio..lol.. (In the Summer went Ron Bailey School directly across the street from KISN and got it then by Fall — and yes the memorize questions…failed in Portland went to Seattle because the FCC had not changed the test)..

    #42325

    Steve Naganuma
    Participant

    With all the discussion about 1st, 2nd and 3rd phone licenses, let’s not forget about the Restricted Radiotelephone Operator Permit.

    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-MFBJEKMe5Gs/UpsgRnZV_rI/AAAAAAAAjLA/kMb1qqfswMQ/s1600/restricted_radio_permit.png

    The little card looked like it was cut from a cereal box top. Also, it may seem out of context, but I re-posted the above 10Q aircheck because of the discussion on taking meter readings on directional AM stations.

    #42327

    semoochie
    Participant

    The restricted radiotelephone operator permit replaced the radiotelephone third class operator permit and shortly thereafter, the general radiotelephone license replaced the first AND second class radiotelephone licenses. Not long after that, I believe that the FCC stopped issuing the general class and restricted permit as well. In the end, no license was required for broadcast.

    #42328

    Andy Brown
    Participant

    “the FCC stopped issuing the general class and restricted permit as well”

    That is wholly inaccurate. Those licenses still exist and you must still fill out forms and pass tests. Who needs to have them no longer includes radio or TV broadcast personnel although a designated chief operator is still required in radio and tv (except LPFM). Services such as aviation, marine and international fixed public stations still require repair and maintenance to be performed by a person holding a General Class Radiotelephone License.

    https://www.fcc.gov/wireless/bureau-divisions/mobility-division/commercial-radio-operator-license-program/commercial-0

    #42329

    semoochie
    Participant

    First off, I began the sentence with, “I believe”, which always means that I’m not certain. Secondly, my last sentence indicates that I was referring to “broadcasting” and as I recall, the chief operator is required but a license is not. It’s up to the station to decide if he/she is qualified. I’m sorry if I wasn’t clear.

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