KISN gets on the Web

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 47 total)
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  • #49634
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    At this point (much as it troubles me to say it) the early 80s can now start to be considered “oldies” as the case may be. In fact a lot of classics from a good 40-60+ years prior were being covered and brought out of obscurity by performers in the 80s, including Taco Ockerse.

    10 years ago I would have vehemently denied this, but sufficient time has passed that my generation’s music is now starting to transcending the realm. At 37 what does that make me?

    #49635
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    “At 37 what does that make me?”

    • scared
    • feeling over-the-hill

    Generation-X is over 40, and some of it is in its 50s. The older Millennials are crossing the age 40 threshold now. As this happens, I think that the cultural gaps between Generation-X, Millennials, and “Generation-Z” will become more noticeable.

    As an aside, I was slightly surprised (but not excessively so) to hear Taco Ockerse’s cover of “Putting on the Ritz” on Sunny 1520 shortly before that station became La Gran D. In that era, nostalgia formatted stations were starting to add some MOR hits from the early 1980s and 1970s.

    #49639
    Screamer
    Participant

    If “Classic Rock” or “Classic Hits” become such at 25 years, we should be hearing songs from 1996 in those formats.

    #49640
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    AM Only used to play Taco’s “Putting on the Ritz” occasionally back in the day, as I recall. I remember first hearing it in the early to mid 90s, when it was still running on 910. It was one of the extreme few recent-ish cuts and I think one of the even fewer (if not the only) new wave cuts they played at the time. I think it was mostly Ed Brand (about my mom’s age AFAIK, so probably came of age when it was popular) and Jeff Rollins who ran it… doubt Chick Watkins would have ever been caught dead putting it on the air himself!

    When Chick retired as PD in the late 2000s and Carl Southcott replaced him, that’s when they really went to town adding late 70s/80s/early 90s soft rock and MOR to the library.

    (Just my own observations, FWIW.)

    #51651
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Car radios often used intermediate frequencies near 260 kHz. In my recollection, the nominal IF for variable-inductance tuned radios was 262.5 kHz. The IF in our 1986 Dodge Caravan (with AM stereo) was 255 kHz. I determined the latter when I discovered that parking the minivan a few blocks from a 1230 kHz transmitter site produced an image at 720 kHz. These low intermediate frequencies have the benefit of placing the 2x intermediate frequency birdie out-of-band.

    Years ago (maybe 15 or 16 by now) waiting in mother’s 1997 GMC Yukon 1500 with factory radio/cassette (external CD player), outside the Home Depot at Marine Drive/205 for her to finish up, I decided to try DXing Canada on mediumwave from there and received this scrappy-sounding image of the now long-gone “Laker” 334 kHz NDB (“IA”/** *-) behind Boeing’s Gresham facility on 1330, underneath KKPZ! 334 * 4 = 1336 so I guess that’s close.

    I have no idea what the stock radio’s IF was, though it did seem to have a decently wide AM section (no stereo). I don’t remember hearing it anywhere else on mediumwave, just there.

    #51652
    stevewa
    Participant

    Superhet AM radios pretty much standardized on 255KHz pretty early on. I’ve got a 1930s Zenith console that has same.

    #51657
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    I remember hearing the “Laker” NDB interference while driving on I-84 to Mount Hood Community College when I was a volunteer at KMHD until 2001.

    I don’t want to get excessively pedantic, but it seems that in the vacuum tube era, radio IFs converged on two values (for radios made in the U.S.:

    ~262 kHz -> For mediumwave-only radios with two RF tuning stages; car radios and some better quality domestic radios fit this category.

    455 kHz -> Low-cost mediumwave-only radios with only one RF tuning stage (such as All-American five radios) OR almost any radio with shortwave, regardless of the number of RF tuning circuits

    455 kHz also made its way into some higher quality radios with two stages of RF tuning, presumably because 455 kHz IF transformers were so readily available.

    With the advent of ceramic filters, the ~262 kHz intermediate frequencies disappeared because the filter elements would have needed to be thick, and the improved selectivity of this technology yielded adequate selectivity at the higher frequency. The advent of PLL-tuned radios shifted the IF to 450 kHz because that frequency works both with radios that tune 9 kHz increments and radios that tune 10 kHz increments.

    #51658
    semoochie
    Participant

    Both of our Color TV/Stereo consoles had a heterodyne squeal on 910, as did every portable. There were also cheap, aftermarket car radios that did.

    #51660
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    I have a 1960s transistor radio with a squeal on 1410 kHz. This puzzled me for a long time. Then I came up with the hypothesis that this radio used something other than 455 kHz for the IF or it was re-tuned. Voila! I found another squeal at 940 kHz. 470 kHz * 2 = 940 kHz. 470 kHz * 3 = 1410 kHz.

    #51662
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Did you get it locally, around here? If so I bet they must have retuned it (like you suggested) perhaps to hear KISN more clearly.

    #51663
    stevewa
    Participant

    You’re absolutely right. It was 455. Clearly losing my mind over here!

    #51666
    chessyduck
    Participant

    And speaking of the thread title, I noticed KISN-LP and KQRZ-LP audio streams seem to be geo-fenced again. The streams work in Portland and Seattle but outside the Northwest they’re not available. Bummer.

    #51668
    tombrooks
    Participant

    I just emailed Dave at KISN headquarters… here are the areas listening as of 5 minutes ago… Mexico London Netherlands Finland Seattle all others are in Portland .. From our Web service…

    #51669
    john72ss
    Participant

    years after kisn left 910, the squeal was back on sunny 910, i was so happy when they moved to 1550, what a shame no oldies music here anymore!

    #51671
    semoochie
    Participant

    Sunny moved from 910 to 1520. Years later, Entercom dropped the format and it was picked up by 1550.

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