K103: The 80s, 90s and Today

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 46 total)
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  • #44112
    Chico
    Participant

    Everyone up at Star in Seattle wears like 3 hats, so the 3 person afternoon show really is everyone’s second job. Kent is the longstanding PD, Marina does double duty on news pieces for sister KOMO AM, and Jen is also Promotions Director and APD. Kent for years was also the daily afternoon TV host on KOMO. These people work hard…plus Marina is fighting cancer on top of it all. Easy to afford a 3 person PM team when you can split your budget like that.

    #44113
    paulwalker
    Participant

    All jokes aside welcome to radio circa 2020. Atleast Star is keeping live and local radio alive which is becoming more rare every year. Thanks for that Chico.

    #44168
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Kent was always a hard worker with not enough time in his day to do all he wanted to. He’s been active in theater acting and production as a “hobby” since our old days together at Magic 107 and still manages to find time to continue that according to online reports in addition to all that Chico mentioned.

    #44195
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    I regularly listen to KOMO 1000, as they are the only station with Northwest news that are neither condensed into a stopset-sized block or restricted to morning drive. From listening, I can tell that the people in Seattle are wearing a lot of hats. A big clue is that most of the stories are audio from TV news stories that their sister station airs. I cannot count the number of times that news announcers on AM 1000 make references to photographs or video clips that only the television audience can see.

    #49901
    semoochie
    Participant

    Revisiting the thread title, it occurred to me that the concept of calling the last 21+ years “today”, must be completely unapprehensible, to anyone under 40 and the longer stations keep doing this, the longer that number will continue to climb! It isn’t like they don’t want 40 year-olds to listen!

    #49902
    paulwalker
    Participant

    Think of it this way. When I was was a young teen in Seattle (circa 1972), there was KJR, KING and KOL playing top40. The “oldies” station at that time was KUUU and their idea of the oldies format was early 60’s. So the equivalent today would be an oldies station playing hits from 2009-2011. Nobody would ever call that music “oldies” today, nor would they call this era “greatest hits”. Let’s add “yesterday” to terms that would not be used today. I am certain that some consultant can explain this, but it is absolutely striking to me.

    #49905
    semoochie
    Participant

    That seems like an awfully limited time period. 1955-63 or 64 seems more like it. That’s what KLSC Classic 1410 did in 1974 although I once heard a song from 1967.

    If “yesterday” doesn’t work anymore either, how about “the 80s through today”(or now)?

    #49907
    Notalent
    Participant

    When is history did we ever willingly listen to 50-60 year old music? With the possible exception of Classical, Never!

    That would be like in the 1980’s having multiple stations playing music of the 1930’s on the top signals!!

    Odd times indeed!

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Notalent.
    #49911
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    I have wondered whether the use of the vague term “today” is a contemporary demographic/psychographic issue or whether it is due to the first two decades of this century not having really catchy names. (Note: there are two schemes for defining how years are split into decades. The most familiar says that the first decade of this century is 2000-2009, while the second decade is 2010-2019. An alternate definition uses 2001-2010 and 2011 -2020. The latter is designed to take into account that there was no year zero.)

    The demographic and psychographic issue to which I am referencing involves Generation-X and will soon encompass Millennials. People are living longer, and medical science is making it feasible for women to wait longer before starting families. I was born in 1974 (Generation-X), when my mother was 23. Anecdotally speaking, it seemed quite common for women of my generation to obtain college degrees, take professional jobs, and not have children until they reached their mid 30s to early 40s. Today, when I see young families, the parents appear to be Millennials somewhere in their 30s. My point is that people like the Gen-Xers don’t want to be told that they are getting older. They simply have a perception that the newer music isn’t very enjoyable. Hence, using the vague term “today” communicates the idea of music that is enjoyable and “feels” as though it came out recently, when in fact, it was released well over 10 years ago. The marketing people are easing Generation-X into the mental time-compression phenomenon that happens with advancing age.

    #49912
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    “When is(sic) history did we ever willingly listen to 50-60 year old music? With the possible exception of Classical, Never!”

    Not really. AOR, MOR, EZ Listening and similar formats use a lot of songs that are cover songs. Not necessarily but sometimes these covers were hits for the original release, more often not. Those originals are frequently two to five decades old so in fact, by being a listener of said formats these days you are listening to 50 year old music. People don’t know nor do they care.

    For example, “Yesterday” by The Beatles has been covered more than 2200 times, with Joan Baez, Liberace, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, En Vogue, and Boyz II Men.

    Julie London’s “Cry Me A River” is a jazzy number from 1955 has been covered by a huge range of people, including Barbra Streisand, Joe Cocker, Aerosmith, Rick Astley, Björk, Merle Haggard, and Olivia Newton John.

    Abbie Mitchell is the person who originally sang “Summertime,” in the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess, but Janis Joplin’s cover is probably the most well-known version. But Sonny and Cher did a version, too, and so did R.E.M.

    There are many more example of songs that are covers that came out and got lots of airplay 50 years down the road.

    Judy Garland’s “Over The Rainbow” is one of the most frequently performed songs during American Idol auditions and has also been covered by plenty of musical greats. Non-Idol cover versions include Willie Nelson, Patti LaBelle, Eva Cassidy, Eric Clapton, Chet Atkins, Tori Amos, Me First & The Gimme Gimmes, and Israel Kamakawiwo’ole.

    “The Look Of Love” by Dusty Springfield was written by Burt Bacharach and originally sung by Dusty Springfield for the first Casino Royale soundtrack in 1967, “The Look of Love” has been covered a lot. The Zombies, Diana Ross, Gladys Knight, Nina Simone, Marvin Gaye, Shirley Bassey, and Diana Krall are just a few of the artists who have made it their own.

    The recent release from The Third Mind (formed by guitarist and vocalist Dave Alvin—the Americana cornerstone best known as a cofounder of the Blasters—teamed with Camper Van Beethoven’s Victor Krummenacher (bass, vocals), Counting Crows/CVB’s David Immerglück (guitar, keyboards, vocals) and Richard Thompson Band drummer Michael Jerome) contains a cover of Fred Neil’s “The Dolphins” from the sixties and would fit in many low energy formats like K103, but they’re too busy paying consultants whose hands are in the pie when it comes to playing stuff that’s not by established artists or bands. Established in the fact that there is no familiarity with the names. Name recognition is important in low creativity radio.

    WRT Alfredo’s take on how broad “today” is interpreted is spot on. With the exception of the term “newer” music which is meaningless. There is very little on the radio that is NEW music. As I explained above, there are many covers being recorded today, many of which are unknown. Many other songs are taken from pieces of old standards and old pop tunes and disguised so as to not get sued. The only NEW music is heard on hit radio formats where the songs are generated by computer algorithms so the record company can own the artist , the tune, the radio stations where it will get copious plays and have in house lawyers to fight off any lawsuits. Real new music by emerging artists can only be found on college radio, LPFMs and artists own web sites. Pandora, Spotify and the rest are all owned by big money and getting into their streams isn’t quite as easy as it might sound. All for 1/16th of a penny every time it plays.

    Source of cover song info from Mental Floss

    • This reply was modified 7 months, 3 weeks ago by Andy Brown.
    #49915
    RadioHiker
    Participant

    Could also have something to do with pop music not evolving ask quickly as it used to… pop music 10 or 20 years ago sounds much more similar to pop music today than was the case in the 1970s or 1980s.

    #49923
    semoochie
    Participant

    All I know is if you play music for 40 year-olds and refer to a time when they were 19 as “today”, there’s a huge disconnect!

    #50032
    stevewa
    Participant

    Contemporary attitude towards disco is encapsulated in the scene in the movie Airplane! where we see the aircraft in question clip the tower of “WZAZ in Chicago, where Disco Lives Forever” which was the biggest audience cheer in the movie.

    #50035
    paulwalker
    Participant

    Radiohiker: “Could also have something to do with pop music not evolving ask quickly as it used to… pop music 10 or 20 years ago sounds much more similar to pop music today than was the case in the 1970s or 1980s.”

    Excellent point. To demonstrate this, I have had SXM for the past several months (free with certain new car brands, for awhile anyway.) As many are aware, they have channels for each of the decades. 50’s on channel 5, 60’s on 6, 70’s on 7, 80’s on 8, 90’s on 9, etc. Being a pop/rock fan for most of these decades I have spent a lot of time listening to this service, especially their 60’s and 70’s channels. What is striking is how the music changed so dramatically in both. The early 60’s had a definite 50’s vibe that remained even to when the British Invasion started. A lot of that sound continued through about 1966 or ’67. But of course everything changed with the Beatles and harder rock was definitely a part of the scene in the late 60’s. 70’s also changed quite a bit with a lot of hooky, (but somewhat silly) pop songs, and rock that was certainly evolving. Then disco. 80’s brought new alternative sounds, (SXM even has a channel called “First Wave”)

    It seems to me this evolution began to slow down in the 90’s, probably somewhat due to the split between pop/rock and urban/rap. And by the 2000’s the music really didn’t evolve much as you point out. Of course I am talking about mainstream pop/rock, not niche’ formats.

    #50037
    Jeffrey Kopp
    Participant

    SiriusXM will make you a deal if you say you are going to quit. I pay $6 a month and it is very well worth it. I listen to 80s on 8 and Yacht Rock.

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