K103: The 80s, 90s and Today

Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
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  • #43753
    Jeffrey Kopp
    Participant

    I am a fan of 80s music, which is why I subscribe to SiriusXM, though one can hear plenty of it on the air now that 80s is Oldies.

    My daughter, who is in her thirties, is also a 80s fan.

    #43754
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    In the late 1980s, I had a music teacher who said that he believed that rap pushed the boundaries of what could be considered music (or at least songs). The reason why he felt that way was interesting; he stated that what is unconventional about rap is that rappers don’t sing notes. Instead, he said, what they do is more like “speaking in rhythm.” He said that there are a number of works that are designed to push the boundaries of what can be considered music, such as John Cage’s “4:33,” to which I made a tongue-in-cheek reference in another thread. When performing “4:33” live, Cage would sit at the piano for four minutes and 33 seconds and do nothing.

    To me, rap has a very ironic pro-conformity element to it. The songs are always in 4:4 time, and the notes used are usually 1/16, with 1/8 and 1/32 being used on occasion. I once read an article addressing criticisms against the practice of sampling, and the two things stated in defense were, this is the way we’ve always done things and, samples sound better than attempting to recreate a melody using a keyboard. In addition to that, at least to my eyes, it appears that there is a very limited range of clothing styles that rappers and hip-hop fans are allowed to wear.

    #43755
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    In reference specifically to post #43752, I think that what’s been happening in the 2010s specifically is tied to the rise of YouTube. I once asked some of my co-workers why anybody would want to watch some of the very amateurish videos posted by young video bloggers. He told me that the amateurishness is precisely their appeal. In fact, he told me, when some of these young video bloggers develop better presentation skills, their videos paradoxically receive fewer views. This is because when the YouTube generation sees something that is rough around the edges, they think that they are watching something authentic that they could do themselves.

    I suck at karaoke, so I have to tread lightly to avoid being a hypocrite. In a manner analogous to the video bloggers previously mentioned, I think that the music industry assumes that singers that are noticeably better than karaoke-quality are the optimum quality for the majority of the music-listening public. Singers with great technical abilities singing challenging material, on the other hand, would appeal to my dad because he virtually listens only to classical music. However, Joe Schmoe couldn’t appreciate what these performers do (in part because Joe Schmoe knows that he sounds like an Elsie the Cow-pie when trying to sing along).

    #43761
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    If you really want to be accurate, the decade by decade analysis is sorely lacking and doesn’t really lend itself to the kind of analyses we’re collectively giving it.

    Using “the 70’s” as an example, that period in music really began with Dylan going electric in 1965. Up to that point, folk and folk rock was the dominate segment of quality music. Stax Records didn’t really hit its stride until Otis Redding’s death in ’67. Motown was a little bit ahead of them but it, too, really didn’t solidify until the mid 60’s. So the “70’s” was really the mid 60’s through the early 80’s. Then in 1985 Intel rolled out the 80386 chips and 32 bit processing put audio production into the hands of anyone. Up to that point, it took a lot of money to record music professionally. Sure, compared to what we can do today, it was barely a bump, but it did change music production as nosignal pointed out but it wasn’t just auto-tune, it was the whole process. CD burners became ubiquitous and any garage band could produce themselves. The age of the big record companies took it’s first big gut punch.
    The result was a divergence of music creators. Those that could get a contract did and those that couldn’t or chose to go their own way dove into the new tools at their disposal. Either way, it changed the kind of music being produced, how it was marketed and distributed or sold.

    The next period (from 1985 onward) lasted until grunge hit in the early 90’s. By then, enough small labels and independent artists had figured out how to implement and master the new technologies and then Napster hit and changed the whole dynamic of the music business. By the time Napster was shut down in 2001, it was too late. The cat was out of the bag. In 1996 Congress handed radio to the big industrialists and music filed to divorce radio as its one true partner. Radio has never been the same since. Music has continued to be successful. Radio has not. If you listen to commercial radio today (or anytime after the turn of the century), much of what you hear is exactly what Tom Petty was singing about in the song I linked in my earlier post. Corporate developed artists singing songs written by computers and recorded in corporate studios before being marketed to big corporate radio and the public. That’s when (mid 1990s) kids in their teens stopped listening to radio (first mp3 player came out in 1997) and it remains that way today for the most part. Call it the rise of rap and hip hop if you want, but it’s really about the greed of corporate America and artists finally being able to stick a finger in the eye of big record companies.

    Anyway, you get the point. Parsing stuff by strict decade designation just doesn’t tell the story IMO.

    #43804
    semoochie
    Participant

    Well, I was half right: right city, WRONG station! https://news.radio-online.com/cgi-bin/rol.exe/headline_id=c40738 Maybe K103 will get Mark Wallengren instead: https://radioinsight.com/headlines/183436/mark-wallengren-exits-afternoons-at-kost-los-angeles/

    • This reply was modified 5 days, 6 hours ago by semoochie.
    #43806
    bossjock
    Participant

    Hey, can I ride your coattails to an honorable mention (with my parenthetical musings on this post: https://feedback.pdxradio.com/forums/topic/bruce-murdock-and-john-erickson-both-retiring-dec-20/page/2/#post-43592)?

    Anything is/was possible, I guess, but I couldn’t see a married team leaving a sweet gig ostensibly for the welfare of their young’un to sign on anywhere with an iHeart station. (See: events of this week)

    #43809
    semoochie
    Participant

    They already left their previous station so that wasn’t an issue.

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