Darren Wilson Not Indicted

This topic contains 63 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  Alan Craig 4 years, 10 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 64 total)
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  • #3638

    Amus
    Participant

    Andy,

    #1. Thanks for your summation above in Reply #3618. It;s probably one of the most accurate interpretations I’ve seen of this entire mess.

    #2. Not sure why you waste perfectly good words on Herb. Better to save them for someone who at least has the interest and ability to process them.

    #3640

    jerry1949
    Spectator

    “Refuses to fund education,” as if we don’t already give union teachers enough money. Isn’t $10k per year per student enough? My number 2 son never set foot in public school for 12 grades. I want my $120K.

    Scapegoating the Republicans and conservatives does nothing for the poor. It could be argued that liberalism emasculated black males, broke up families, and keeps blacks perpetually dependent for the sake of a voting bloc.

    At least there is some agreement that this case should be judged by the facts and not by an agenda.

    #3641

    duxrule
    Participant

    I’m not a big Twitter fan, but I think that this tweet from Miss Delaware 2015, Brittany Lewis, puts everything in a nice package, with a bow on top:

    “Being Black in America is exhausting.Y’all want us to sing, dance, play football, run fast, be your target practice, and be quiet.”

    #3642

    Vitalogy
    Participant

    Remember, Officer Wilson started the confrontation by harrassing some black kids walking in the middle of the street.

    Last time I checked, it’s not criminal behavior to be walking in the street, and Officer Wilson did not know if these kids were supsects or not.

    This is typical of how white cops handle blacks in predominently black neighborhoods. Had Officer Wilson not gone out of his way to harrass these boys, nobody would have died over some Swisher Sweets.

    #3644

    Vitalogy
    Participant

    And remember, cops and their teammate prosecuters will do whatever it takes to save their own hyde. And it’s pretty easy when the other guy is dead and deck stacked against you for true justice.

    #3645

    jerry1949
    Spectator

    Wow is that ever unfair. 93% of blacks who end up being victims of “target practice” are because of blacks shooting at them.

    One again, it seems that to some the facts of the case are entirely irrelevant.

    #3646

    Amus
    Participant

    It could be argued that liberalism emasculated black males, broke up families, and keeps blacks perpetually dependent for the sake of a voting bloc.

    It could also be argued (and in fact has by a Conservative Folk Hero) that “the blacks” would be better off if they’d stayed on the plantations.

    It could also be argued that World War II would have ended sooner if Eleanor Roosevelt could fly.

    #3647

    duxrule
    Participant

    Not everyone agrees with the way Darren Wilson was treated by this prosecutor:

    ‘Fanciful and not credible’: CNN legal analyst destroys Darren Wilson’s testimony

    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/11/fanciful-and-not-credible-cnn-legal-analyst-destroys-darren-wilsons-testimony/

    #3648

    jerry1949
    Spectator

    If I’m walking in the middle of the street and causing traffic problems, it is not “harassment” if a policeman tells me to move. That’s called doing his duty.

    If this is a predominantly black community, then any cop, white or black, is working to protect black people.

    #3651

    Vitalogy
    Participant

    It was a neighborhood street, there was no traffic problem.

    Just another white cop on a fishing expedition, looking to create trouble to justify their employment.

    And, ask the black community if they feel cops are there to protect them.

    #3652

    Vitalogy
    Participant

    Ferguson Prosecutor Robert P. McCulloch’s Long History of Siding With the Police.

    http://www.newsweek.com/ferguson-prosecutor-robert-p-mccullochs-long-history-siding-police-267357

    His sympathies for the cops run deep. His father was a St. Louis policeman killed in the line of duty by a black man when McCulloch was 12. His brother, nephew and cousin all served with the St. Louis police. His mother worked as a clerk for the force for 20 years. McCulloch would have joined the force too, but he lost a leg in high school due to cancer. “I couldn’t become a policeman, so being county prosecutor is the next best thing,” he once said.

    All prosecutors are cozy with their police departments—it’s part of their job. Because they rely on police to bring them evidence, a prosecutor who has a bad relationship with them has a hard time making his or her cases stick. But McCulloch’s critics say his loyalty to the police is exceptional.

    McCulloch decried Missouri Governor Jay Nixon’s decision to pull the St. Louis County Police out of Ferguson and put the State Highway Patrol in charge, even after the local force’s response to the protests turned Ferguson into a war zone. “To denigrate the men and women of the county police department is shameful,” he said.

    “I’m not sure there was another person in the hemisphere who thought they were doing fine,” said Jeff Smith, a former Missouri state senator who represented inner-city St. Louis.
    Edward Magee, a spokesman for McCulloch, said the prosecutor does not shy away from charging police officers. “In the 18 years I’ve been in the office, we’ve charged numerous officers,” he said.

    It’s one thing for a prosecutor to defend cops he relies on to do his job. But the dynamics in St. Louis County are more complicated: a racially divided area in which white police forces stand accused of abusing the black communities they are supposed to protect. McCulloch didn’t create this dynamic, but he has become a symbol of it.

    St. Louis County, which includes 90 small municipalities that encircle the city of St. Louis, is highly segregated, with black people concentrated in the north and the white middle and working class in the south.

    To bring in revenue, many of these municipalities rely on traffic violations—and the fines that result. Both county and municipal forces disproportionately stop black drivers. Ferguson’s police force has 50 white officers and three black ones. One young black man told Slate he is stopped about 10 times a month.

    A recent report by the legal defense nonprofit ArchCity Defenders found that 86 percent of vehicle stops in Ferguson involved a black driver, although just 67 percent of the city’s 21,203 residents are black. These traffic violations, which sometimes lead to weeks in jail, are an enormous burden on the black community. In 2013, the Ferguson Municipal Court disposed of 24,532 arrest warrants and 12,018 cases—“about 3 warrants and 1.5 cases per household,” the report said. Fines and court fees are Ferguson’s second largest revenue source.

    “We’re just used to raise revenue,” said Patricia Bynes, a Democratic committeewoman for Ferguson Township. “On traffic day in these little municipalities, you usually find a white judge in the courtroom, white prosecutor, and you find lines of black people lined up around the corner that have been charged with these tickets.”

    This constant low-level harassment of the black community has become the main point of contact between most black residents and the criminal justice system. And it always comes with the threat of violence. As multiple news reports since the Brown shooting have revealed, police in North County too often use excessive force against the black community.

    #3657

    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Thanks, Amus.

    “It was a neighborhood street, there was no traffic problem.

    Just another white cop on a fishing expedition”

    Wilson had heard the call about the robbery and was in the area. He wasn’t just cruising the hood looking for black kids to hassle. He also saw the box of cigars early in the encounter.

    #3659

    Vitalogy
    Participant

    So says the cop, who will say whatever he needs to say to get off.

    #3660

    jerry1949
    Spectator

    Remember the witnesses that said they saw Brown being shot in the back? Then when forensics proved otherwise, they changed their stories. Wilson didn’t have the luxury of being able to change his testimony to fit the facts. Of course he didn’t need to anyway. His testimony was honest and consistent with the facts, in spite of the biased opinion of a CNN “expert.”

    #3661

    duxrule
    Participant

    “His testimony was honest and consistent with the facts, in spite of the biased opinion of a CNN “expert.””

    And you know this how?

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