Coastal Radio Happenings

Viewing 15 posts - 271 through 285 (of 300 total)
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  • #48362
    chessyduck
    Participant

    From the current pages of MCH Enterprises, a broadcast brokerage outfit: http://www.mchentinc.com/broadcast-stations-for-sale/

    PRICE REDUCTION! OREGON COAST AM. Perfect opportunity for first-time station ownership. This AM Station was left behind when an associated FM station was sold. The Station operates with 1,000 watts, day and night and the Seller wants a quick sale. The Station currently operates from the transmitter site and will soon begin programming Christmas music both on-air and on the Internet. The asking price is only $25,000 for an all-cash deal. Seller will consider terms with a qualified Buyer for $50,000 with $10,000 down and a note for $40,000.

    #48364
    paulwalker
    Participant

    25k for a 1,000 watt on the coast? They would have to pay me to take it!

    #48365
    mwdxer1
    Participant

    Several AM’s on the coast where I live are barely making it. KSWB for one. No staff, just a owner working his tail off to pay the bills as he loves radio so much. None of the AMers in the county are doing well, but how much AM Radio is doing well anywhere except maybe in big cities?, except like the 50 KWers.

    #48367
    Broadway
    Participant

    KCUP Toledo Newport Oregon

    #48380
    chessyduck
    Participant

    I guess it would be KCUP as the FM side, KPPT, was recently sold off. Perhaps Jefferson Public Radio could step in , filling content similar to 1280 AM in Eugene. Of course, JPR probably is focusing on the AM 1230 Talent rebuild.

    #48393
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    I do not mean for my question to sound too naive or condescending. Who listens to Oregon coast radio stations, and who advertises on them? Only on one occasion when I visited the coast have I heard a radio playing in a public place (at the outdoor seating area of a restaurant in Seaside). It would also seem to me that visitors looking for a place to eat or shop would be more likely to consult Yelp, Google maps, or possibly ask the hotel front desk staff for recommendations than base their decisions on a commercial heard on the radio.

    #48395
    lastday
    Participant

    Wouldn’t the audience consist primarily of local residents?

    #48399
    paulwalker
    Participant

    Yes. Especially since tourists don’t know or care about local radio. That is why a low powered AM would only reach a very small number of listeners, if any. Even more frustrating is a low power AM would follow tourists for about 10-15 minutes due to terrain. Tourists likely wouldn’t even try and listen to AM except if trying to listen to their KXL or KEX. In the case of KXL I don’t think their fm signal performs well on the coast, but I could be wrong.

    #48461
    boisebill
    Participant

    My past experience is that none of the Portland AMs are do all that good on the coast. Especially since there’s power lines all along highway 101. 620 & 750 were the best in the North.

    #48483
    chessyduck
    Participant

    Tourist-focused radio has always been a niche market. I am not sure if the Oregon Coast ever had such a station, although broadcasters once could count on higher ad revenue during summer months from hotels, restaurants, etc. Perhaps today’s ads for Moe’s heard on Coast stations are an echo of those days.

    I did see KEJY (AM) in Eureka was once prograamed as “Destination Radio” but the website’s audio stream now seems defunct,

    Big tourist destinations like Florida had seen more of this type of radio. Years ago, I remember listening to the wall-to-wall ads and infomercials on now-silent WFVR Florida Vacation Radio from Valdosta. Disney also had a 250-watt experimental FM in Columbia City, Florida, geared to promote their properties.

    Today, the Internet rules all for tourists’ ears and eyes.

    #48485
    semoochie
    Participant

    It seems to me that when Kisn ruled the roost, KSWB had the ear of many tourists. That was over 50 years ago!

    #48486
    mwdxer1
    Participant

    When KSWB first came on the air with 1KW Days on 930 in 1968, the owners were Jim Dennon and the Brothers Four singing Group from Seattle. As a kid I used to hang out at KSWB before I started out at KVAS Astoria. Portland & Seattle DJs used to pop in often and several were hired in their early days. The Management decided early on, since KISN 910 was top notch in Portland and KSWB 930 was only 20 kHz away, when the visitor would hit Seaside the splatter from 930 would get people to turn over from KISN to KSWB. It worked too. KSWB was different than KISN, but still a popular Top 40 station that by far had the strongest signal of any AM of the North Coast. KSWB had quite a sales team in those days pulling a lot of advertising from Astoria that KVAS/KAST would have had. All of the kids listened to KSWB, but unfortunately not being on at night killed their chances of really competing. In 1972 KSWB was sold from a group of DJs from Montana (Wolf Point area), and they wanted KSWB to become a “Seaside” station, changing the format to more pop. The GM said that when he would hear tourists listening to KSWB, they would think the station was an extension to KISN.
    Then in 1984 KSWB was granted to move from 930 Daytime only to 840 where they could have night time authorization (1 KW day/500 w night). So they could finally compete from KVAS and KAST. One reason KSWB came on was there was little local radio reception in Seaside at night. KVAS 1230 was lost in a jumble except the Northern part of Seaside and Gearhart, as in those days the graveyard channels (local) of 1230, 1240, 1340, 1400, 1450, & 1490 had to drop to 250 w at night. KAST was better in Seaside at night being a less crowded frequency, but still not great as they have to protect San Jose CA at night, to the South.

    #48491
    Scott Young
    Participant

    My experience riding in the car from Portland to Seaside as a kid was exactly as you described. KISN’s westerly lobe put an impressive signal on the north coast, and it was only the 930 splatter right near Seaside that made it unlistenable. We just slid up the dial to KSWB until we headed back home. Good times…

    #48494
    Master of Disaster
    Participant

    This is only anecdotal evidence, but the Master of Disaster took a day trip with some friends to the Pacific Northwest Coast this last summer. None of us listened to a single minute of music the way there or the way back. The Master of Disaster remembers seeing an apparent radio station office in Astoria near the Astoria Bridge but cannot recall the station or the format or anything about it really.

    This comes from someone that once liked to sit in the parking lot and perform an AM/FM bandscan on the car radio while everyone else was doing normal coast stuff they do at the coast!

    In the 1990s and early 2000s, the “fade-out point” for the Portland FMs seemed to be Milepost 12 of US 26.

    #48495
    W7PAT
    Participant

    I was in the Astoria area yesterday. 1230 KKOR is still off-the-air but the FM translator on 106.3 is still on. I’m not sure how that is legal, but… there was a lot of dead air on 106.3 as well, perhaps where commercials were supposed to be.
    1370 KAST is now the only AM there, but of course, no problem receiving Portland or Seattle. There is not much in the way of local programming except for KMUN. Pretty sad.

    • This reply was modified 4 weeks ago by W7PAT.
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