Bye bye Ajit Pai

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  • #49478
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Not unhappy that the FCC will get a new Chairperson and a Democratic majority.

    Pai leaves with a message that is so pro big business it may make you nauseous. Don’t say I didn’t warn you.

    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/01/3mbps-uploads-still-fast-enough-for-us-homes-ajit-pai-says-in-final-report/

    Some say he ruined the internet when he eliminated net neutrality. Sure, Mitch McConjob is really to blame for recommending him to Prez. Obama. Pai has been against net neutrality long before it was a hot topic. Being so blatantly pro big biz is clearly why drumpfilthinskin named him Chairman.

    https://slate.com/technology/2021/01/ajit-pai-fcc-net-neutrality-goodbye.html

    Pai also waited until the re-election year to ramp up going after Chinese electronic espionage, but the drumpfster still lost. Ha!

    https://www.businesstoday.in/current/world/departing-us-fcc-chief-ajit-pai-wanrs-of-threats-to-telcos-from-china/story/428617.html

    So bye-bye, Ajit Pai. Drove our policy to the levee and we still wonder why.

    h t t p s://w w w.theregister.com/2020/11/30/ajit_pai_resignation/

    #49479
    Borderblaster
    Participant
    #50537
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Jessica Rosenworcel is currently serving as a member of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). She originally served on the FCC from May 11, 2012 to January 3, 2017, and was confirmed by the Senate for an additional term on August 3, 2017. On January 21, 2021, President Joe Biden picked her to be the interim chair of FCC, making her the second-ever woman to serve in this position.

    During her initial term as an FCC Commissioner, Rosenworcel voted to enforce net neutrality by classifying Internet service providers as Title II common carriers, overturn state laws that protect Internet service providers against competition from municipal broadband, change the technical definition of “broadband” from 4 Mbps to 25 Mbps, use the LifeLine program to subsidize Internet access for low-income individuals, and expand consumer protection against robocalls. On the latter topic, Rosenworcel in 2019 argued that the FCC should order telecommunications companies to provide free call-blocking services. On March 17, 2021, she kicked off an anti-robocall agenda. This agenda includes issuing significant fines to companies, demanding ceast-and-desist, and launching a Robocall Response Team.

    On net neutrality, Rosenworcel said, “We cannot have a two-tiered Internet with fast lanes that speed the traffic of the privileged and leave the rest of us lagging behind. We cannot have gatekeepers who tell us what we can and cannot do and where we can and cannot go online, and we do not need blocking, throttling, or paid prioritization schemes that undermine the Internet as we know it.”

    Rosenworcel has been a champion of updating national education policy in order to connect the country’s schools and libraries with high-speed Internet. In addition, Rosenworcel is responsible for coining the term “homework gap”, and has brought attention to the need of students to get online when they are outside of school.

    Rosenworcel supports proposals to improve communications infrastructure and location accuracy for 911 calls from cell phones, and supports the expansion of FirstNet, a dedicated wireless network for emergency services workers.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jessica_Rosenworcel

    #50539
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    change the technical definition of “broadband” from 4 Mbps to 25 Mbps

    Uh… what?

    She’s obviously confusing “broadband” with “high-speed” or “high throughput”. The technical definition of “broadband” communications is multiple simultaneous services over the same physical carrier or channel, e.g. analogue voice and XYZDSL data, frequency-division multiplexed over a common copper pair, or a cable headend operating NTSC, ATSC-QAM and DOCSIS over its coax/fibre/coax-fiber system. Hell, a stereo FM station with SCA could be loosely considered a “broadband” carrier under that same definition. It has nothing to do with data throughput rates, though that hasn’t stopped the commercial mass media from bastardising it as such.

    I don’t know if this is something she actually said, or just the typical poor quality of Wikipedia copywriting. But if this woman really believes that and is going to be in charge of the agency overseeing the nation’s telecommunications industries, then will somebody please buy her a dictionary?

    #50542
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    The point is that for service to underserved areas will have to be S.O.A. instead of a dozen years behind, which is what the Pai FCC would have.

    The Republicans promised service to rural areas beginning with the Telecom Reform Bill of 1996 in exchange for Clinton signing on to the destruction of ownership rules. He got nothing.

    No one cares about petty shit like the differentiation of terminology. I used to be like you. It gets you nowhere in the bigger picture. The marketing guys have been using the term bandwidth loosely when it should read throughput for over 20 years, and the result is what gets written into the pedia. Thanks for pointing it out, though. Blame her editor for putting it out or the wiki team for not fixing it, but it’s aside from the notion of meeting current standards instead of the Republican desire to do as little as possible.

    #51072
    Steve Naganuma
    Participant

    “Biden’s executive order puts net neutrality back in the spotlight”

    https://www.theverge.com/2021/7/9/22570567/biden-net-neutrality-competition-eo

    #51073
    lastday
    Participant

    “Broadband” is commonly understood to mean what she said: fast (reliable) internet access. The technical engineering definition is kind of irrelevant at this point. Terminology evolves.

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