99.1 KPQR/KSFL-LP on Air for Testing

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 39 total)
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  • #6842
    Chris_Taylor
    Participant

    If you want to hear the actual musical content of KSFL go to the online presentation at http://www.prp.fm.

    #6847
    Dan Packard
    Keymaster

    Reception reports should now make it to engineering@prp.fm. Thanks for reporting problem, Andy. Sorry, I didn’t have all the levers positioned correctly. :-/

    #6871
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    From my location in Hillsboro, I either receive a good signal from KODZ (Yagi pointed south) or a partially-nulled KODZ with noise and some other stuff mixed in (Yagi pointed east). I cannot separate out the “other stuff” well enough to establish that it is the KSFL-LP test broadcast.

    While driving through parts of Portland, however, I did have a very solid signal, particularly in SE (heading north from the Hawthorne Bridge. Going south on I-5 or Barbur Blvd, picket-fencing starts to set in after passing the riverside OHSU buildings.

    #6872
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Does anybody know the answer to the following antenna questions:

    • Is the KSFL-LP antenna circularly polarized or is only horizontal polarization being used?
    • How many bays are used?
    • A few years ago, I saw what looked like a discone atop the KBPS tower. What is/was the purpose of the discone?
    #6874
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    The CP says:

    Maximum Effective radiated power in the Horizontal Plane (watts): 100

    Minimum Effective radiated power in the Horizontal Plane (watts): 50

    So more than likely it is a single bay circularly polarized antenna. LPFM would rarely require anything more than a single bay, which is more economical and less loading on a tower than a vertical and horizontal yogi or log periodic with 1/4 wave spacing (achieves circular polarization). You can stack and stagger those for directional applications but LPFM doesn’t normally allow DA’s. You can stack C.P. elements for gain, but what on earth would you need gain for. You’re going to be better off with TPO at whatever is required to meet ERP through one element and avoid the multi path you get with two or more bays.

    Don’t know about the discone. Receiving antenna?

    #6875
    Steve Naganuma
    Participant

    The discone was put up there by KQAC engineering. Not sure for what purpose, but we discovered there was no cable attached.

    #6876
    Steve Naganuma
    Participant

    Here are some pictures of the 99.1 antenna installation.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/129690224@N03/

    #6882
    semoochie
    Participant

    I had the opportunity to listen to 99.1, while driving around town. I found it acceptable all over the east side although I never got much past !-205. It actually sounded pretty good in Oregon City. Given that the antenna is on 12th Avenue and not on a hill, I thought it held its own fairly well. I am now more optimistic about KISN, as far as the areas I usually drive.

    #6883
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    “I am now more optimistic about KISN, as far as the areas I usually drive.”

    Totally different challenges with respect to co channel and first adjacent channels to contend with outside the 60 dBu contour. KSND (1007 m AMSL 477 m HAAT) could be a real problem in a lot of places for trying to get 95.1. There isn’t a topographic feature to block KSND from propagating right into the outer southeast, especially since it is way up high. 99.1 on the other hand, has no full service co channel and zero first adjacent signals within 150 km. of Stonehenge. 95.1 has two full service co channels within the same distance. As I wrote in the other thread, don’t assume anything about reception behavior outside the 60 dBu contour for one LPFM will apply to any other LPFM, which is exactly what you are doing. You might even have line of sight to Mt. Scott, but if you are, e.g. 8 or 9 miles away, you may find all kinds of interference trying to pull it in.

    Using the same example I used in the other thread, and expanding it, you can’t assume that just because KINK and KGON both have their 60 dBu contour reaching Rte. 22 that driving from Stayton to Mill City will result in similar reception quality for both stations. That is an example at the 60 dBu contour. What about further from the 60 dBu contour? Do you realize how significant it is to go even a few miles beyond the 60 dBu for an LPFM? That’s like going 20 miles beyond the 60 dBu of a Class C (at least, possibly more). So unless you are referring to the “as far as the areas I usually drive” being inside or right at the 3 mile limit of 95.1, your optimism is misplaced and premature. You’ll find out when they start broadcasting and speculating based on another channel’s coverage isn’t at all dependable. KXRY couldn’t get into downtown because of all the RF running loose up and down the Valley. They were up high on Rocky Butte. 95.1 may end up with the same result.

    http://tinyurl.com/o7585n

    #6891
    semoochie
    Participant

    I don’t get anything on 95.1 now. KQRZ is supposed to move there and 105.9 could be an issue but I’m not expecting miracles. I just think transmitting from the top of one of the Mt. Scott towers should work fairly well in a lot of the east side of Portland.

    #6892
    jr_tech
    Participant

    “I had the opportunity to listen to 99.1, while driving around town. I found it acceptable all over the east side although I never got much past !-205. It actually sounded pretty good in Oregon City.”

    What model radio? I’m guessing HD as *most* seem to have better sensitivity and 1st and 2nd adjacent rejection (as well as better capture ratio) than even the *best* analog radios had a few years ago.

    #6894
    Scott Young
    Participant

    2 watts from the top of Mt. Scott should do well on the east side of Portland as long as nothing gets in the way. Trouble is, there’s definitely a “something” to potentially get in the way on 95.1. I know there are places where KSND is receivable on a car radio on the east side. Coming southbound across the I-205 bridge you can clearly see Mt. Scott dead ahead, and clearly hear KSND. When KISN signs on which one will you hear? It’ll be interesting to find out. My experience has been that it doesn’t take much signal at all to quiet a receiver on a clear frequency and you can be deceived into thinking you’re hearing a reasonably strong signal when you really aren’t. Will KISN’s 2 watts be enough to cover KSND in that location? Really looking forward to some 95.1 field testing to find out once KISN gets on the air. I’ve been having a blast listening to 99.1’s performance while driving around. Low power is a lot of fun to experiment with and observe.

    #6919
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Testing on 99.1 appears to have ended as of yesterday.

    #6922
    semoochie
    Participant

    Well, my response is gone again. 🙁 I thought I hit “enter”. I’ll try again: The radio in question is in a Dodge Mini-van and is not HD. I’ve noticed it had good selectivity before in that when I’m in an area of Lake Oswego, I get a Classical station on 92.9, with no first adjacent interference. I don’t receive KSND well enough to listen, anywhere in the metro area. I hadn’t thought of the Jackson Bridge but are you sure it isn’t the station south of Chehalis?

    #6925
    jr_tech
    Participant

    “when I’m in an area of Lake Oswego, I get a Classical station on 92.9, with no first adjacent interference”
    Very likely K225BF in Turner which repeats KWAX… I can receive it pretty well in Hillsboro with my antenna pointed south, great DX catch for a car radio!

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