80s MTV VHS Recordings

Viewing 8 posts - 16 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • #46113
    mwdxer1
    Participant

    That is interesting about the -R vs +R. I mainly used -R’s for years as I could play them on about any machine. Some would not play + discs. In recent years I have recorded using both Verbatim + & – discs. I do find one thing interesting about the + discs, at the 2 hour mode I can get more time on a + disc by several minutes. I have no idea why.
    Again great advice for everyone. Wish I would have known more earlier…. But so far so good.

    #46114
    mwdxer1
    Participant

    I have several friends that still have their old Pioneer DVD Recorders (Make in Japan), and they still do well. Unfortunately the one I got was their last one made in China. A piece of junk. I was really surprised Pioneer would drop that low, being the cream of the crop for decades. Their Stereo systems in the 70s were amazing.

    #46123
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    The mention of “Gold” discs reminds me of an experience I had over 15 years ago.

    I purchased a cheapie BTC internal CD-RW drive. It worked reliably when I used major brand-name discs in it. Then, I saw these huge spindles of bargain “MultiPoint” CD-Rs and made an impulse buy. It turned out that the BTC drive was prone to turning the MultiPoint discs into coasters. Some years later, I tried burning MultiPoint discs using the CD-RW drive in a Dell laptop from work. I achieved reliable burns every time. The drive/media compatibility issue boggles my feeble brain.

    #46124
    mwdxer1
    Participant

    I have had a couple stand alone CD recorders too. One was so picky that is would not record anything newer. If did ok on Sony’s for the most part, but the TDK’s of other brands it did not like. Yet, all of those other brands will record on the burner in the computer.

    #46127
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    For those who had trouble with the original MTV video link, try the following:

    mtv-80s-vhs-full-recording-collection/1981.08.01

    I am downloading this big file now.

    #46236
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Their stereo systems in the 70s were amazing.

    Actually they still are, at least until their aging transistors start flaking out and getting noisy.

    #46237
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    The caps fail way before the transistors do, unless you ran your speaker wire under the rug ten years ago and then forgot about that when you stapled down the new carpet.

    Oh, and not all stereo systems from the 70’s sounded great. That was when the lower middle and low end stuff stopped using discrete components in their power amplifier circuits in favor of integrated circuit final power outputs. I fixed a lot of gear back then and every single manufacturer (sans the super high end stuff) was guilty of competing in the bargain category and had one or two low end models with I.C. outputs. Sounded like crap and were not very rugged. Times have changed but back then the circuits being used by the major players in the high fidelity game all used discrete components running Class B (push pull) designs. Also, this was just as we were breaking the 90 dB S/N barrier. Our test equipment at Fred’s Sound Of Music didn’t even go much past that. Analog FM required only 60 dB S/N. Everything everywhere sounded warm and fuzzy like a vintage Fender tube guitar amp and people liked that. Once we moved to chips and 100 dB+ S/N everything sounds brittle, curt, sharp and less inviting.

    #46241
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Isn’t the problem of transistors becoming noisy or non-functional in their old age primarily associated with germanium devices? All the transistors that I have run across where this has happened have been germanium.

    The explanation that I have seen is that germanium devices can’t be passivated to keep moisture from contaminating the junctions. Germanium oxide, as one engineer once told me, “turns to $#!+.” Therefore, germanium transistors have to be put into hermetically sealed metal packages. Germanium transistors were commonly used in audio equipment in the 1960s, but they were quickly phased out in audio equipment for a variety of reasons, including reliability.

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