5G Promises speed and low latency

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  • #27816
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    but don’t hold your breath. In a nutshell, the cell guys plan on using higher frequencies where bandwidth is plentiful but the big drawback is that at those frequencies, range is diminished requiring more cell sites with fiber backhaul from every every site in the network. That kind of infrastructure investment has knees knocking at AT&T and Verizon. So while the hype and the advertising will roll out soon, the reality is not on the horizon until maybe 2020.

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/5g-data-is-coming-and-it-will-supercharge-your-internet-connection-180451777.html

    #27817
    Andrew
    Participant

    Still doing fine with 4G myself – don’t have any real need for an upgrade in the foreseeable future.

    #27825
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    I’ve never had a cell phone, don’t want one, probably won’t ever buy one. Still surviving just fine with my -1G rotary dial service.

    I think any more these days it’s kind of a status symbol to not have one.

    #27829
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    The advertising and hype in trade journals for the electronics design and semiconductor industries are already underway. This is despite the details of the 5G standards not yet being completely defined!

    #27832
    semoochie
    Participant

    There will come a time when there will be no more long lines. AT&T asked for a firm date about ten years ago.

    #27833
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    I think they’ve already converted most of their T-carrier voice trunks to some sort of VOIP by now haven’t they?

    (You know, these are the times I REALLY wish Skybill was still here!)

    #27848
    Andy Brown
    Participant

    Bill posted this elsewhere in response to my posting the same story:

    There is already fiber backhaul at any site that has 4G and at most of the 3G sites too. The AWS frequencies (1700 MHz to 2100 MHz) is what VzW and others are calling their 4G+ or Advanced 4G. I’ve seen speeds of almost 100 Mbs on it. Of course it depends on how many users are on that particular sector at any given point in time.

    #43248
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    None of this tech is even available yet, but my mom’s RF-fearing, health-nut neighbor (one of my old school teachers and someone I’ve personally known for a VERY long time) has gotten herself all paranoid over the perceived health effects of this evil, insidious 5G and all the microwave towers that are supposedly going up all around the neighborhood even as we speak and putting “5G rays” (her term) into her house. She has a website that tells her the locations of all the cell phone towers, including ones that have so-called “5G Enhanced” or whatever they call it (i.e. 5G features being emulated on 4G service), but of course to her she just sees the abbreviations and assumes they are all the same thing.

    I was at her place a couple hours ago to fix a broken telephone wall jack (ended up having to pull a new cable to the demarc) and every. single. fucking. topic. of discussion invariably cane back around to “well, this 5G is here now, what can I do to stop it? I don’t want these ‘5G rays’ in my house and body!!!” I eventually got so fed up with this crap that I finally said to her, “okay here’s what you do. Build a house in the middle of Death Valley, pack up and move out there! Do you get it? Will you stop now?”

    Of course, this is the same person who refuses to have a flat-panel LCD anywhere near her where baby/toddler grandsons have access because of the X-ray emissions coming from the back of the “LCD tube” and affecting their brains’ development but thinks nothing of putting a 1-watt 2.4 GHz analog voice transmitter next to the head end of the crib and leaving it plugged in 24-and-7. Seriously.

    On the other extreme, she’ll turn blind eyes to the 2-band 802-11 equipment that she’s been using every day for almost 10 years, or the 1.9 GHz Iphone and 15-year old 5 GHz VTECH digital spread spectrum cordless surgically attached to her ears. :rolleyes: :facepalm:

    That’s another thing. Now she wants me to work out and design some sort of timer to automatically power her Commiecast DOCSIS box off overnight so it doesn’t emit “5G rays” while she sleeps (ideally without attracting the attention or ire of the cable company, or completely losing my patience, both of which are much easier said than done). (It’s one of those newer models that also has the “xfinitywifi” access point.)

    Yeah, uh huh. Good luck with that. Not my responsibility.

    #43249
    Andrew
    Participant

    Well, obviously 5G is five times more deadly than 4G, innit?

    Maybe the best way to fix her 5G issue is to change the name to something else. Maybe call the 5G radio waves “natural health beams” or something.

    #43250
    nosignalallnoise
    Participant

    Oh yeah, I mean, 5G is the devil. It’s going to make the Earth’s poles shift, the North American continent be flooded under 1000 feet of water (which will flow uphill, by the way) and bring democracy to North Korea! It’s a conspiracy, I tell you!!!

    #43251
    Vitalogy
    Participant

    I’m no RF tech, but for god’s sake if Osprey can build nests in cell towers and successfully hatch eggs year after year after year, isn’t that a pretty reasonable assurance there’s no issue? Even then, there’s not really any documented evidence of RF, cancer, etc. Not one.

    As for 5G, couldn’t care less. My shit is on wifi 95% of the time. In fact, in Feb we switched our 3 iPhones from Verizon where we were paying $200/mo (including an employee discount) to the same 3 iPhones with Xfinity Mobile working on the same Verizon network. Our bill including taxes has averaged about $48 a month since the switch. So if you have Comcast broadband at home you’re an idiot if you don’t switch to Xfinity mobile.

    #43254
    Chico
    Participant

    Pretty cagey move on Comcast’s part. Can’t exactly cut the cord if you’ve married people’s cell coverage with their home Xfinity box, now can we? They don’t have to make a cent on the wireless service (spoiler, they do, and plenty) as long as it acts as a customer retention mechanism for the stunningly profitable coax into the house.

    Genius.

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