15 years since 9/11

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  • #22832
    paulwalker
    Participant

    Time flies. And more remarkably teenagers today have no memory of this important event.

    Perhaps more importantly, there has been little terrorism in the US, (atleast even nearing that scale), since.

    Like the Kennedy assassination, these events will continue to bring the anniversary (for lack of a better term), reminders, and I think they are important. We will see the same in 2021, and again in 2026. These events need to be reminded.

    CNN has a new original doc that will air a week from tomorrow night. I intend to watch it because it likely will be important.

    #22841
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    Those teenagers do not remember a time when friends and family could meet arriving flyers at the terminal or when it was not necessary to remove one’s shoes during security screening. Despite how long ago the attacks happened, the effects have been far-reaching.

    I would like to pose the question, is US society today more xenophobic than it was immediately before the attacks? Is US society today more xenophobic than it was in the 1980s–an era when it was still OK to tell Polish jokes.

    #22842
    paulwalker
    Participant

    To try and answer your question…yes and no.

    I think there are some portions of the population that are more xenophobic, and to move this to the political realm for a second, Trump is responsible for some of this. Or perhaps Trump is just capitalizing on it.

    The “no” part is mostly the liberal side that considers this argument to be unfounded and, frankly, asinine. I tend to agree with this, though I still consider myself a moderate conservative who will vote for Hillary this year.

    But, enough about politics. Your example of Polish jokes to me has less to do with xenophobia than just growing up with Dad’s who liked to tell them, and was meant as kidding. Atleast that was my take on it growing up in the 60’s and early 70’s. There never was any overtly religious or even cultural intent there, though one could argue against that I suppose. Bottom line, my elders always told Polish jokes (with half my heritage Ukranian, haha), but to this day I don’t have one iota of ill-feelings toward the Polish. So I guess I survived the mass injustice of ethnic jokes from my childhood. Today seems to be both literally and figuratively a long ways from all that mostly lighthearted nonsense.

    #22846
    Vitalogy
    Participant

    I don’t think we are more or less xenophobic than in the recent past, we are just more connected and every single person on this planet has a platform to show the entire rest of the world their true colors.

    #22855
    Alfredo_T
    Participant

    My question was inspired by one on Quora that asked, how have the attitudes of most Americans changed since 1990? The question made me think, how have historical events shaped the overall mood of the country. Two “problems” with posing my question this way are that (1) there is no agreeable metric for something like xenophobia and that (2) it doesn’t take into account division in public opinion on controversial issues like this one.

    I am not implying that everybody is on board with “xenophobic” attitudes. Indeed, the Clinton campaign’s official stance is one of supporting a “pathway to full and equal citizenship,” rather than of enhancing border security measures. Likewise, all of the work environments that I have been in, either before or after 9/11 have been quite diverse.

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