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P2P downloads down 30 percent...

(6 posts)
  • Started 3 years ago by missing_kskd
  • Latest reply from Alfredo_T

  1. missing_kskd

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    Posts: 14,523

    maybe.

    But, the bigger story is no uptick in music sales.

    http://copyfight.corante.com/archives/2011/03/24/cnet_and_others_get_it_wrong_miss_the_actual_story.php

    This is interesting, not that it validates piracy. Not where I'm headed with that. It's all about breaking down the piracy = lost sale meme that impacts so much of our increasingly draconian IP law.

    (a topic where President Obama and I strongly disagree)

    This:

    And were I an actual paid reporter, I might have dug into what I think is possibly the most interesting music-sharing story of 2011, which is that people aren't downloading music as much anymore, but they're sharing it more than ever. Streaming music, both legal and illegal, is finally taking off in a big-time way. People no longer feel as much need to have their own copy of an MP3 on their disks because they're confident they can be connected all the time to a network that will supply them the sounds they want when they want it. Between broadband penetration to homes and a proliferation of pocket devices (mostly calling themselves cell phones) that have the ability to stream low-bitrate MP3s or better, we are likely to see the local storage of media go the same way as email has gone in the past decade. And that will impact old markets like P2P networks far far more than yet another sharing company shut down by the Cartel.

    ...is something I find interesting.

    Long ago, when mp3 first hit the scene, a good friend and I discussed listening to the tunes where they were, vs archiving them. At the time, I was strongly in the archive camp, just for fear over pay per play, and or simple lack of access / legal issues.

    At the time, we both had fairly large libraries of tunes we had ripped from vinyl and CD online to listen to and share. We also would share with ssh tools, having directories and accounts on a few machines, where people could just drop stuff, or pick stuff up, largely avoiding the mess.

    Anyway, just a interesting take, IMHO.

    I still am not completely pleased with the idea of listening in the cloud, but a lot of people are. Google is exploring music on the cloud, trying to get cloud rights from the labels, so they can offer a variety of services to people, much like was tried early on.

    That's intriguing to me now, where it was not before. Overall improvements in tech, and some time has passed. Worth a revisit, IMHO.

    To think, had the majors actually granted Napster the same consideration, the money made would have been absolutely huge. What a missed opportunity!

    Posted on March 26, 2011 - 01:54 PM #
  2. motozak3

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    Posts: 4,469

    "People no longer feel as much need to have their own copy of an MP3 on their disks because they're confident they can be connected all the time to a network that will supply them the sounds they want when they want it."

    <skepticism> Bollocks. The idea that streaming is becoming increasingly popular only further validates the need to archive. It's necessary as a fallback: so that when the network goes down, or the user is in a massive dead spot/faraday-cage office building/etc., or (cr)Apple decides no-one needs, say, MP3 capability any more and suddenly cuts everyone's devices over to, say, ALAC-only playback, then what do they do? Put a tape in? </skepticism>

    Muzak (yes, another Muzak analogy) have been doing something like archiving for years. Their current (?) generation of satellite receivers store a large amount of music on the receiver's internal hard drive, for example, as a fall-back for if the satellite signal fails or is otherwise interrupted. If an interruption in reception occurs the receiver can automatically cut over to the music in local storage until the signal returns. Especially useful if the outage is caused by bad weather--Ku-band satellite signals, in general, can become notoriously unreliable during the monsoon season (read: this time of year.)

    "At the time, I was strongly in the archive camp, just for fear over pay per play, and or simple lack of access / legal issues."

    Still doing the archiving thing, particularly because of the largely antequated, kludgey tech I have. Last I checked I have several devices using removable/fixed storage vs. zero that have 802-11 or some other sort of cordless network access. (I do have a laptop and PDA that can have such capability added in via PCMCIA/Compact Flash cartridges, but that's a different story altogether.)

    At least with archiving you can refer back to a stream as many times as you need. Take in a stream through VLC and walk away from it for several hours, come back, stick the resultant huge file on a CD, drop it into your M1L2/3-capable CD player and badabing.

    (Another reason to really, really love VLC..... ;o)

    <skepticism> The whole "cloud" thing is really just a passing fad as far as I am concerned. It'll probably come to pass in a few more years when everybody gets sick enough of it. </skepticism>

    Posted on March 26, 2011 - 03:38 PM #
  3. It's simple... type names of popular songs into youtube, chances are good it's there (with some notable exceptions). One click later, you can hear it, with video or sans video.

    Which brings up another point, it's much easier for others to control things. When one downloads a copy of something (or even buys a physical copy), they know they have it and it won't change on them. Rely on a website, and the things can be taken down, modified, or something happens in a way like the content never existed in the first place. Couple this with a few generations of people who don't know information but instead know where to find it, and it's combination fit for disaster.

    A personal point I can make: when Wikipedia started, I thought it was stupid. Then when I tried to do web searches looking for particular information, no matter what search site I used they all brought up worthless domain-squat websites, and websites trying to tell me that there was no point in looking for what I needed and I should instead buy a product/service. Later found what I needed on Wikipedia, complete with a source link. These days, lots of times I'll just start typing "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/..." into the address bar followed by whatever it is, and poof! There's something containing ACTUAL CONTENT.

    However, Wikipedia could go down tomorrow and everyone would be screwed. A website could pull a controversial song by a band and claim it never existed. A while back, someone else here said something like 'just wait until cell phone calls get delayed due to not enough bandwidth being available to handle all the traffic generated by everyone.'

    Posted on March 26, 2011 - 08:13 PM #
  4. And what happens when the big Solar Flare comes to town ??? The big E.M pulse from the almighty ? eh ?

    Like the one in 1859 that even took out a few Telegraph systems..( as there were very few of those then )...

    Posted on March 26, 2011 - 08:24 PM #
  5. motozak3

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    Posts: 4,469

    "When one downloads a copy of something (or even buys a physical copy), they know they have it and it won't change on them. Rely on a website, and the things can be taken down, modified, or something happens in a way like the content never existed in the first place."

    Yup.

    Posted on March 26, 2011 - 09:09 PM #
  6. Alfredo_T

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    Posts: 5,154

    George Orwell didn't know how right he was in predicting a society where history would be re-written as deemed necessary (by those having the power to initiate the re-writing). Without Wikipedia, YouTube, and Google, using the Internet to find information is actually work, as Master of Disaster alluded to above.

    I think that this trend really is about copyright holders or intellectual property owners getting what they had yearned to have for so many years--that is, when everything is delivered by streaming, you (the end user) will rent all of the content. Old music, movies, and TV shows will become licenses to print money, as an aging population demands its fix of nostalgia.

    Posted on March 28, 2011 - 03:29 PM #

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